Interactive graphic: One year after the Wainstein report

Check out this interactive graphic to see what UNC employees named in the Wainstein report think about it one year later:

wainstein1
The Wainstein Report: One year later
Academic employees
Thursday marks the one-year anniversary of the release of Kenneth Wainstein’s eight-month-long investigation into the former Department of African and Afro-American Studies. In Wainstein’s report, there are 31 current University employees named or quoted, not including Section IV of the report that summarizes all interviews conducted by the Wainstein’s team. Some of these 31 had knowledge of the paper class scheme. Some were completely unaware. All were a part of the most in-depth review of the biggest case of academic fraud in University history. The Daily Tar Heel has compiled all 31 employees here and asked each individual his or her opinion of the report. 
Compiled by Bradley Saacks and Liz Bell Graphic by Bradley Saacks and Kelsey Weekman
Athletic employees
Named employees in the athletic department
Chloe Russell
André Williams
Brent Blanton
Mike Fox
Roy Williams
Scott Forbes
Home
Sylvia Hatchell
Corey Holliday
Jennifer Townsend
Anson Dorrance
Spencer Welborn
Kym Orr
Tammy McHale
Todd Austell
Jonathan Hartlyn
Arne Kalleberg
Bereket Selassie 
James Moeser
Lissa Broome
Karen Gil
Jan Yopp
Alice Dawson
Lloyd Kramer
William Andrews
Named employees in the academic department
Alphonse Mutima
Bobbi Owen
Kathleen Harris
Michael Gerhardt
Eunice Sahle
Travis Gore
George Lensing
Athletic Employees
Current position: Associate Director of the Academic Support Program for Student-Athletes  What Wainstein said about him: The report states Blanton directed some of his players to paper classes when he was a counselor for several Olympic sports teams, including the women’s soccer team. Blanton also suggested to longtime women’s soccer head coach Anson Dorrance that he use the paper classes to help recruit top players to Chapel Hill. "For example, on one occasion, Blanton specifically suggested that Dorrance mention Crowder, and the past use of 'AFAM/AFRI independent study courses' by women’s soccer players, while communicating with a potential recruit,” one footnote read.  What he said about the report: Blanton declined to comment over the phone.
Academic Employees
Brent Blanton
Next
Kym Orr
Previous
Current position: Academic Counselor for Student Athletes What Wainstein said about him: Orr knew the classes existed and did not require attendance, the report said, but claimed he did not know how the classes were conducted.   What he said about the report: Orr said he thinks the University has been exhaustive in their response to the scandal and doesn’t think further review is needed. He said the report has not affected his life in a professional or personal manner. “It’s the past, and it will remain the past for me,” Orr said. 
Spencer Welborn
Current position: Assistant Dean for Academic Advising  What Wainstein said about him: Welborn began working for the University as an academic counselor in 2008 and remained there until midway through 2014. He became aware of the paper classes through students he advised, and was under the impression that the classes were run by the department chair, who "who would meet with the students a 'few' times and required a research paper that the students could complete at their own pace. Welborn stated that he did not recall anyone questioning the propriety of the courses."  What he said about the report: Welborn declined to comment on the report through a spokesperson. 
Jennifer Townsend
Current position: Associate Director of Academic Support for Student Athletes What Wainstein said about her: Townsend took over for Wayne Walden as the men’s basketball academic counselor, among other sports, in 2009. She learned about the paper classes from Robert Mercer, the former director of Academic Support Program for Student Athletes, and was determined not to have much direct involvement with the paper class implementation because Crowder left before she arrived at the University. "Townsend also explained that men’s basketball assistant coach Joe Holladay wanted the basketball athletes to go to class and not take independent study courses,” the report said.  What she said about the report: Townsend declined to comment through email. 
Chloe Russell
Current position: Assistant Dean for Academic Advising  What Wainstein said about her: Russell joined the advising department in 2008 and learned to send struggling students to the former department of African and Afro-American Studies. At later point, Russell’s boss told her not to trust the department and Russell had limited interactions with the department after that. What she said about the report: Russell declined to comment through a spokesperson. 
Current position: Head Women’s Basketball Coach What Wainstein said about her: Hatchell told Wainstein’s team that she knew many of her players took paper classes, but did not know the classes were offered without normal class requirements like attendance. She entrusted her team’s academic counselor, Jan Boxill, with the handling of her players’ schedules and classes. Hatchell even believed Deborah Crowder was a faculty member, according to the report.  What she said about the report: Hatchell was unable to comment on the report due to the ongoing NCAA investigation. 
Sylvia Hatchell
Current position: Head Men’s Basketball Coach  What Wainstein said about him: Williams brought his two top academic personnel with him from Kansas University: Wayne Walden and Joe Holladay. The report stated that Williams would occasionally talk to players about their classes, but mostly left that to Holladay and Walden. When he arrived at UNC, Williams was troubled with the amount of African and Afro-American Studies majors on the team, according to the report.  He claims he was never told anything about the format of the classes, including that a non-faculty member was grading them.  What he said about the report: Williams is unable to comment on the report because of the ongoing NCAA investigation. 
Roy Williams
Mike Fox
Current position: Head Baseball Coach What Wainstein said about him: Though two baseball players told Wainstein’s team that the classes were common knowledge, Fox denied knowing anything about the structure of the courses. He is known, the report says, for benching players for not performing academically.  What he said about the report: Fox could not comment on the report due to the ongoing NCAA investigation. 
Current position: Assistant Baseball Coach  What Wainstein said about him: In an interview with Wainstein’s team, Forbes said the team has a strict attendance policy, and he was generally aware of the classes the players were taking but did not recall any knowledge of African and Afro American Studies classes.  What he said about the report: Forbes could not comment on the report due to the ongoing NCAA investigation. 
Scott Forbes
Current position: Head Women’s Soccer Coach What Wainstein said about him: Dorrance denied any knowledge of how the paper classes, but said he tried to arrange for less strenous classes for his players that had national team committments. Blanton, his advisor for a portion of Dorrance’s tenure, handled most of the players’ academic scheduling and emailed Dorrance that he should use the paper classes as a selling point to potential recruits. What he said about the report: Dorrance could not comment on the report due to the ongoing NCAA investigation. 
Anson Dorrance
Current position: Associate Director of Development for the Arts & Sciences Foundation and the former Director of Football Student-Athlete Development  What Wainstein said about him: He was aware of the paper classes, but was not concerned by them because they were offered to the entire student body.  "He understood that all the coaches knew about the paper classes, and stated that for the coaches it was a big issue for them to make sure their athletes were completing their papers,” the report said. Williams was also in attendance for the now-infamous 2009 powerpoint from the football counselors who were concerned that Crowder’s retirement would lead to many players becoming ineligible.    What he said about the report: Williams declined to comment on the report via telephone. 
André Williams
Corey Holliday
Current position: Associate Director of Athletics What Wainstein said about him: Holliday knew of the classes and that they were offered in an independent study format. He admitted that he knew the classes were easier, but not that they were fraudulent.  Holliday was in attendance for the now-infamous 2009 powerpoint from football counselors, who detailed who Crowder’s paper classes had kept players eligible for years prior.  What he said about the report: Holliday declined to comment through a spokesperson. 
Current position: Professor of Dramatic Arts and former Senior Associate Dean for Undergraduate Education  What Wainstein said about her: Owen, it was written, had lunch with Julius Nyang’oro in 2006 to complain about the large number of independent studies listed under his name. The following semester, independent studies dropped and Owen emailed Nyang’oro to thank him for quieting down his side of campus.  "She never asked what sort of instruction Nyang’oro was actually providing to those hundreds of independent studies students registered under his name each year,” the report said. What she said about the report: Her attorney informed The Daily Tar Heel that Owen has no comment until further review by the University is done. 
Bobbi Owen
Travis Gore
Current position: Administrative Assistant in the African, African-American and Diaspora Studies department What Wainstein said about him: Gore began working under Crowder in 2001 and took over for her after her retirement in 2009. After Crowder’s retirement, Gore would get schedules from Nyang’oro and put them into the computer.  "Gore acknowledged that his understanding of a paper class was a course that did not meet and required the student to write a paper. Gore recalled that for the paper classes after Crowder left, Nyang’oro would give him a list of topics that the class could write on, and Gore would provide the topics to the students,” the report said.  What he said about the report: Gore intially lied about his identity when asked for comment. After following up with Gore, he disclosed his identity and declined to comment on the report. 
Travis Gore
Jonathan Hartlyn
Current position: Associate Dean of the College of Arts & Sciences and Senior Associate Dean for Social Sciences and Global Programs in the College of Arts and Sciences What Wainstein said about him: Hartlyn, along with fellow dean William Andrews, was one of the first to review the academic improprieties in the department. Hartlyn said University administration was more concerned with faculty members not teaching enough courses in a semester, not too many courses. After the issues with Nyang’oro’s first popped up in 2011, Hartlyn immediately reported it to Karen Gil and was tasked with reviewing the department. What he said about the report: Hartlyn declined to comment through a spokersperson. 
Current position: Dean of the College of Arts & Sciences What Wainstein said about her: Her first knowledge of the paper classes came when Jonathan Hartlyn reported it to her in 2011 after he met with Nyang’oro.  Wainstein wrote that Gil did not know of "the irregularities within AFAM.” What she said about the report: Gil declined to comment through a spokesperson. 
Karen Gil
Current position: Professor of English and former Senior Associate Dean for Fine Arts and Humanities What Wainstein said about him: With dean Jonathan Hartlyn, Andrews delivered the first review of the department in 2012. The review covered 2007 to 2011 and found that 51 courses were conducted irregularly.  What he said about the report: Andrews declined to comment on the report through an email. 
William Andrews
Current position: Professor of Law in UNC School of Law and member of the Faculty Executive Committee What Wainstein said about him: Gerhardt was a part of a three-person subcommittee of the Faculty Executive Committee after the Hartlyn-Andrews report in 2012 to "recommend any changes necessary to prevent such breaches of academic integrity as were found within the AFAM Department.” The report became a subject of scrutiny after articles accusing then-faculty chairperson Jan Boxill tampering and watering down the report. Gerhardt told Wainstein’s team that Boxill’s edits did not reflect any alternative motivations, in his opinion.  What he said about the report: Gerhardt said he is proud of the reforms the University has implemented since the scandal, but thinks UNC should maintain “perpetual scrutiny" to stay on top of past mistakes and stop future ones from unfolding. He said he stands by the 2012 report.
Michael Gerhardt
Bereket Selassie
Current position: Professor of African, African-American and Diaspora Studies What Wainstein said about him: Selassie described himself as a close friend of Nyang’oro’s but admitted hhe found him to unusual in how he ran the department.  Crowder also added students to Selassie’s classes without his knowledge. "At the end of the semester, Professor Selassie recorded a grade of AB (an incomplete grade that technically means “absent from the exam”) for a football player who never attended the lectures or the exam. When we asked Professor Selassie about this student, he was flabbergasted to see that the AB for that football player had been changed to an A- through a grade change form,” the report said.  What he said about the report: Selassie did not respond to multiple requests for comment.
Current position: Professor in the School of Media and Journalism and Dean of Summer School at UNC   What Wainstein said about her: Yopp approved the late addition of a summer school class for Nyang’oro in the summer of 2011. Nyang’oro told Yopp that it was so a student could graduate. She said she did not know Nyang’oro would not be there for most of the summer. She then went through records and saw the large amount of classes from Nyang’oro’s department were listed under “staff.”  "Yopp explained how the old enrollment system and the associated paperwork could be exploited to allow such overteaching to remain undetected, as faculty members did not receive notice of every course listed under their name.”   What she said about the report: Yopp declined to comment through email, saying she “would not be a good source.” 
Jan Yopp
Alphonse Mutima
Current position: Professor of African, African-American and Diaspora Studies What Wainstein said about him: Mutima said he struggled to work with student-athletes who would take his Swahili courses and blamed Crowder for funnelling them to his classes. The report notes that Mutima had some knowledge of the paper classes Crowder was running, and, aside from complaining to Crowder, he did not report them to anyone. He also occasionally used them to his advantage, as he allowed Crowder to create a sham Swahili 403 that kept student-athletes out of his classes. What he said about the report: Mutima delined to comment on the report and confirmed that he was being reviewed by the University. “The University hasn’t made a definitive decision regarding my situation,” he said.
Eunice Sahle
Current position: Chairperson of the African, African-American and Diaspora Studies department  What Wainstein said about her: Sahle’s knowledge of the classes was less than that of fellow professors Tim McMillan and Alphonse Mutima, but she still was aware of them. She allowed Crowder to sign up several students in her lectures to mask the true nature of the class. "According to Crowder, Professor Sahle was aware that she was adding paper class students and 'agreed that a few students could get away with not showing up and doing a paper at the end [of the semester].'Crowder’s recollection is corroborated by an email in which she tells Wayne Walden that one of his players can take a Sahle lecture class without having to attend,” the report said.  What she said about the report: Sahle declined to comment on the report through a spokesperson. 
Current position: Research Asssistant Professor and Academic Advisor in the Chemistry department What Wainstein said about him: In a footnote in the report, Wainstein’s team notes that Austell would recommend that chemistry majors with full schedules take classes in the former department, as well as Communications, to lighten their course loads. He did not know about the paper classes but was aware of the difficulty level of the courses.  What he said about the report: Austell declined to comment on the report through email. 
Todd Austell
Todd Austell
Current position: Professor of Law in UNC School of Law and member of Faculty Athletics Committee and UNC’s Faculty Athletics Representative to the NCAA What Wainstein said about her: Broome, with her extensive experience on faculty advisory groups, was a part of the Faculty Athletics Committee that reviewed independent studies in 2006.  The committee did not investigate any further than the intial discussion about the independent studies; however, the report makes sure to note a section of the Martin Report stating the committee told athletic department officials class structures were determined by professors was rescinded after it could not be verified.  What she said about the report: Broome said she had no issues with how her interview was portrayed in the report. 
Lissa Broome
Lloyd Kramer 
Current position: History professor and former Faculty Athletics Committee member What Wainstein said about him: Kramer was at the 2006 Faculty Athletics Committee meeting where student-athletes courseloads were discussed. Kramer did not have any knowledge of the paper classes prior to media reports of them.  What he said about the report: Kramer said he was pleased with the amount of research the Wainstein team put into the interviews. 
Current position: Sociology professor and former Faculty Athletics Committee member What Wainstein said about her: The report said Harris recalled discussing independent studies in 2006 with the Faculty Athletics Committee. Wainstein said Harris felt good about the status of independent studies at UNC. Harris recalled discussion about what an independent study is, but was sure the committee did not have a more detailed description of the paper classes.  What she said about the report: Harris did not respond to multiple requests for comment.
Kathleen Harris
Current position: History professor and former Faculty Athletics Committee member What Wainstein said about him: Lensing, the report said, was also at the 2006 Faculty Athletics Committee meeting when independent studies were discussed. He said the committee discussed the high number of athletes in independent but didn’t recall any department coming up.  What he said about the report: Lensing did not respond to multiple requests for comment.
George Lensing
Current position: Sociology professor and former senior associate dean for social sciences What Wainstein said about him: The report said Kalleberg was the last dean to approve Julius Nyang’oro’s reappointment as chair of the department. As a part of the chair review, Kalleberg interviewed faculty in the department and found no evidence that irregular classes were happening.   What he said about the report: Kalleberg said he does not regret his decision to reappoint Nyang’oro as the chair. “He was the best person for the job at the time.” He said the report accurately portrayed his interviews with the team. 
Arne Kalleberg
Current position: Senior Associate Dean for Finance and Planning What Wainstein said about her: McHale was in charge of monitoring teaching loads, among many other duties, and would have noticed if a professor was teaching more than 300 courses a semester, the report said. She said she did not focus on anyone teaching too many classes, but instead focused on professors who didn’t meet the minimum requirements.   What he said about the report: McHale declined to comment on the report through a spokesperson. 
Tammy McHale
Alice Dawson
Current position: Senior Assistant Dean of Academic Advising What Wainstein said about her: As part of the “good old girls network” — a web of advisors in the Steele building and elsewhere on campus — Dawson admitted to Wainstein’s team that she sent one or two students to AFAM classes per year who were struggling in their personal lives. She did not know that no faculty member taught the classes.  What he said about the report: Dawson declined to comment on the report through a spokesperson. 
Current position: Music professor, former UNC chancellor What Wainstein said about him: Moeser, who served as chancellor from 2000-08, denied knowledge of the AFAM paper classes. He kept a close eye on the athletic department and attended Faculty Athletic Committee meetings. When an academic scandal broke at Auburn University in 2006, Moeser met with UNC leaders to make sure nothing similar could happen at UNC. He and others, concluded that it couldn’t.  What he said about the report: Moeser said he is proud of the University’s response to the scandal, especially through Wainstein’s comprehensive report. He said the situation continued without detection for years because of two main problems: the fact that the academic support system for student athletes was, in reality, a part of the athletics deparment, and the lack of review of the AFAM department and its chair. When asked about the University’s balance between athletics and academics, Moeser said he remains confident that UNC can juggle both roles successfully. 
James Moeser
Thursday marks the one-year anniversary of the release of Kenneth Wainstein’s eight-month-long investigation into the former Department of African and Afro-American Studies. In Wainstein’s report, there are 31 current University employees named or quoted, not including Section IV of the report that summarizes all interviews conducted by the Wainstein’s team. Some of these 31 had knowledge of the paper class scheme. Some were completely unaware. All were a part of the most in-depth review of the biggest case of academic fraud in University history. The Daily Tar Heel has compiled all 31 employees here and asked each individual his or her opinion of the report. 
Current position: Associate Director of the Academic Support Program for Student-Athletes  What Wainstein said about him: The report states Blanton directed some of his players to paper classes when he was a counselor for several Olympic sports teams, including the women’s soccer team. Blanton also suggested to longtime women’s soccer head coach Anson Dorrance that he use the paper classes to help recruit top players to Chapel Hill.  "For example, on one occasion, Blanton specifically suggested that Dorrance mention Crowder, and the past use of 'AFAM/AFRI independent study courses' by women’s soccer players, while communicating with a potential recruit,” one footnote read.  What he said about the report: Blanton declined to comment over the phone.
Current position: Academic Counselor for Student Athletes What Wainstein said about him: Orr knew the classes existed and did not require attendance, the report said, but claimed he did not know how the classes were conducted.   What he said about the report: Orr said he thinks the University has been exhaustive in their response to the scandal and doesn’t think further review is needed. He said the report has not affected his life in a professional or personal manner. “It’s the past, and it will remain the past for me,” Orr said. 
Current position: Dean of the College of Arts & Sciences What Wainstein said about her: Her first knowledge of the paper classes came when Jonathan Hartlyn reported it to her in 2011 after he met with Nyang’oro.  Wainstein wrote that Gil did not know of "ofthe irregularities within AFAM.” What she said about the report: Gil declined to comment through a spokesperson. 
Current position: Professor of Law in UNC School of Law and member of the Faculty Executive Committee What Wainstein said about him: Gerhardt was a part of a three-person subcommittee of the Faculty Executive Committee after the Hartlyn-Andrews report in 2012 to "recommend any changes necessary to prevent such breaches of academic integrity as were found within the AFAM Department.”  The report became a subject of scrutiny after articles accusing then-faculty chairperson Jan Boxill tampering and watering down the report. Gerhardt told Wainstein’s team that Boxill’s edits did not reflect any alternative motivations, in his opinion.  What he said about the report: Gerhardt said he is proud of the reforms the University has implemented since the scandal, but thinks UNC should maintain “perpetual scrutiny" to stay on top of past mistakes and stop future ones from unfolding. He said he stands by the 2012 report.
Current position: Professor of African, African-American and Diaspora Studies What Wainstein said about him: Selassie described himself as a close friend of Nyang’oro’s but admitted he found him too unusual in how he ran the department.  Crowder also added students to Selassie’s classes without his knowledge. "At the end of the semester, Professor Selassie recorded a grade of AB (an incomplete grade that technically means “absent from the exam”) for a football player who never attended the lectures or the exam. When we asked Professor Selassie about this student, he was flabbergasted to see that the AB for that football player had been changed to an A- through a grade change form,” the report said.  What he said about the report: Selassie did not respond to multiple requests for comment.
Current position: Professor of African, African-American and Diaspora Studies What Wainstein said about him: Mutima said he struggled to work with student-athletes who would take his Swahili courses and blamed Crowder for funnelling them to his classes. The report notes that Mutima had some knowledge of the paper classes Crowder was running, and, aside from complaining to Crowder, he did not report them to anyone. He also occasionally used them to his advantage, as he allowed Crowder to create a sham Swahili 403 that kept student-athletes out of his classes. What he said about the report: Mutima delined to comment on the report and confirmed that he was being reviewed by the University. “The University hasn’t made a definitive decision regarding my situation,” he said.
Current position: Professor of Law in UNC School of Law and member of Faculty Athletics Committee and UNC’s Faculty Athletics Representative to the NCAA What Wainstein said about her: Broome, with her extensive experience on faculty advisory groups, was a part of the Faculty Athletics Committee that reviewed independent studies in 2006.  The committee did not investigate any further than the intial discussion about the independent studies; however, the report makes sure to note a section of the Martin Report stating the committee told athletic department officials class structures were determined by professors was rescinded after it could not be verified.  What she said about the report: Broome said she had no issues with how her interview was portrayed in the report. 
Current position: History professor and former Faculty Athletics Committee member What Wainstein said about him: Kramer was at the 2006 Faculty Athletics Committee meeting where student-athletes courseloads were discussed. Kramer did not have any knowledge of the paper classes prior to media reports of them.  What he said about the report: Kramer said he was pleased with the amount of research the Wainstein team put into the interviews. 
Current position: Sociology professor and former Faculty Athletics Committee member What Wainstein said about her: The report said Harris recalled discussing independent studies in 2006 with the Faculty Athletics Committee. Wainstein said Harris felt good about the status of independent studies at UNC. Harris recalled discussion about what an independent study is, but was sure the committee did not have a more detailed description of the paper classes.  What she said about the report: Harris did not respond to multiple requests for comment.
Current position: History professor and former Faculty Athletics Committee member What Wainstein said about him: Lensing, the report said, was also at the 2006 Faculty Athletics Committee meeting when independent studies were discussed. He said the committee discussed the high number of athletes in independent but didn’t recall any department coming up.  What he said about the report: Lensing did not respond to multiple requests for comment.
Current position: Sociology professor and former senior associate dean for social sciences What Wainstein said about him: The report said Kalleberg was the last dean to approve Julius Nyang’oro’s reappointment as chair of the department. As a part of the chair review, Kalleberg interviewed faculty in the department and found no evidence that irregular classes were happening.    What he said about the report: Kalleberg said he does not regret his decision to reappoint Nyang’oro as the chair. “He was the best person for the job at the time.” He said the report accurately portrayed his interviews with the team. 
Current position: Senior Associate Dean for Finance and Planning What Wainstein said about her: McHale was in charge of monitoring teaching loads, among many other duties, and would have noticed if a professor was teaching more than 300 courses a semester, the report said. She said she did not focus on anyone teaching too many classes, but instead focused on professors who didn’t meet the minimum requirements.    What he said about the report: McHale declined to comment on the report through a spokesperson. 
Current position: Music professor, former UNC chancellor What Wainstein said about him: Moeser, who served as chancellor from 2000-08, denied knowledge of the AFAM paper classes. He kept a close eye on the athletic department and attended Faculty Athletic Committee meetings. When an academic scandal broke at Auburn University in 2006, Moeser met with UNC leaders to make sure nothing similar could happen at UNC. He and others, concluded that it couldn’t.  What he said about the report: Moeser said he is proud of the University’s response to the scandal, especially through Wainstein’s comprehensive report. He said the situation continued without detection for years because of two main problems: the fact that the academic support system for student athletes was, in reality, a part of the athletics deparment, and the lack of review of the AFAM department and its chair. When asked about the University’s balance between athletics and academics, Moeser said he remains confident that UNC can juggle both roles successfully. 
Current position: Senior Assistant Dean of Academic Advising What Wainstein said about her: As part of the “good old girls network” — a web of advisors in the Steele building and elsewhere — Dawson admitted to Wainstein’s team that she sent one or two students to AFAM classes per year who were struggling in their personal lives. She did not know that no faculty member taught the classes.  What he said about the report: Dawson declined to comment on the report through a spokesperson. 

Thanks for reading.

Read more in Kenneth WainsteinAcademic-athletic scandal

Share on social media?

Comments powered by Disqus

Please note All comments are eligible for publication in The Daily Tar Heel.

In the News


2016-17 March Madness Preview by The Daily Tar Heel

Print Edition

Print Edition