Carrboro Board of Aldermen

Carrboro’s Board of Aldermen is responsible for guiding the town of Carrboro and making policy decisions. Carrboro has a council/manager form of government, which means the aldermen are responsible for the town’s legislative responsibilities. There are six members of the board, along with the mayor who leads it. The current mayor is Lydia Lavelle.

The board is advised by the town manager, along with a number of other advisory boards and committees. These are often run by aldermen. They deal with issues such as economic development, climate change and human services.

Board meetings are held on the 1st and 3rd Tuesdays, work sessions on 2nd Tuesdays, and public hearings on 4th Tuesdays at 7:30 p.m. at the Town Hall at 301 W. Main Street.

See who’s on the board, read upcoming agendas or view meeting minutes.

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Many Chapel Hill officials, such as Town Council member Karen Stegman, work other jobs in addition to their town roles.

Mayors, council members often hold additional full or part-time jobs

Many members of Chapel Hill Town Council and the Carrboro Board of Aldermen — as well as both the Chapel Hill and Carrboro Mayors — hold full or part-time jobs on top of their duties as elected officials. Although their duties often slow down during the summer months and towards the end of December, municipal election season tends to be a very busy time, Chapel Hill Mayor Pam Hemminger said. She said she wants to improve the community by removing barriers to full participation in the council and opening opportunity for greater representation.


Jacquelyn Gist is a candidate for the Carrboro Board of Aldermen. Photo courtesy of the town of Carrboro.

Few faces change on Carrboro Board of Aldermen

The Carrboro Board of Aldermen added one new face Tuesday night.  Incumbents Jacquelyn Gist, Randee Haven-O’Donnell and Sammy Slade were all re-elected, alongside newcomer Barbara Foushee. This is the first time Foushee, whose sister Valerie is an N.C. senator, has run for office. She won around 25.33 percent of the vote, according to unofficial results from Orange County precincts.