EDUCATION


4/12/2018 10:21pm

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UNC goes to Washington: Graduates reflect on their paths to politics

Politicians like N.C. Gov. Roy Cooper and U.S. Rep. David Price, D-N.C., were involved in a variety of campus extracurriculars during their undergraduate careers at UNC, which set them on their political careers.  “There’s no set pathway to get into any career, but especially with politics it’s so liquid to get to that point,”  UNC sophomore Serena Singh said.  Singh, who was recently elected co-chairperson of Multicultural Affairs and Diversity Outreach Committee in the Undergraduate Executive Branch, said having political role models is beneficial because it shows you don’t have to go to law school to go into politics. 


4/11/2018 9:55pm

Howard University students occupied the university's Johnson Administration Building, pictured here. Students occupied the building for seven days to protest a string of administrative malpractices — most recently the misuse of financial aid funds.  

Howard University students protest financial aid scandal, demand changes

Starting March 29, hundreds of students occupied Howard’s administration building for seven days in a protest spurred by a string of administrative malpractices — most recently the misuse of financial aid funds. A group at Howard called HU Resist organized the protests and released a list of nine demands for Howard's administration. Following the cessation of the protest, the group said in a tweet that, through negotiations, the group was able to accomplish university-wide changes.


3/8/2018 3:59am

Photo courtesy of Chapel Hill Public Library, from their book "Courage in the Moment. The Civil Rights Struggle 1961-1964" photographed by Jim Wallace. Protestors had to agree to practice nonviolent resistance by neither assisting or resisting arrest, here the demonstrators are lying on Franklin Street, according to the book. 

Gone but not forgotten: Chapel Hill School District's slow start to desegregation

The Brown v. the Board of Education Supreme Court decision was made in 1954, but the Chapel Hill school board didn’t start desegregating schools until 1960, and desegregation wasn’t complete in Chapel Hill until the summer of 1966.  “Even in progressive Chapel Hill and Carrboro, it wasn’t smooth and some very hurtful things happened,” said Mia Burroughs, a member of the Orange County Board of Commissioners.