LGBTQ

The University offers a number of resources for the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer community. The LGBTQ Center works to foster an inclusive community within UNC. They do this by advocating for LGBTQ rights, setting up educational programs and offering resources to the UNC community relating to these issues.

Over the past few years the state of North Carolina has been involved in a fight over LGBTQ rights. In 2012 the state voted on a ballot initiative known as Amendment One. The initiative passed 61 percent to 39 percent and established a ban on gay marriage in the state’s constitution. A number of groups challenged the constitutionality of the decision, including the ACLU.

In October 2014, North Carolina became the 29th state, plus Washington, D.C., to legalize gay marriage in the United States. The Supreme Court ruled same-sex marriage legal in all 50 states on June 26, 2015. 

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HB2: Everyone's business

As the national debate over North Carolina’s House Bill 2 — which bans nondiscrimination ordinances — intensifies, political and economic pressure against the state continues to build.


FAQs about the logistics of HB2

House Bill 2, which prevents non-discrimination ordinances in North Carolina, was signed into law March 23 by Gov. The bill caused controversy in the N.C. Senate, where Democrats walked out before the vote — allowing it to pass unanimously. Staff writer Zaynab Nasif spoke with legal experts to determine the bill’s implications on all North Carolinians.


Civil rights groups, UNC employee take HB2 to court

“I just want to go to work and live my life. This law puts me in the terrible position of either going into the women’s room where I clearly don’t belong or breaking the law,” Carcaño said in a statement. “But this is about more than bathrooms, this is about my job, my community and my ability to get safely through my day and be productive like everyone else in North Carolina.”