Clark Cunningham

Articles

Clark Cunningham is a senior biochemistry and biology major from Chapel Hill.

Column: Science says this column is good

During any prolonged study session, it is a safe bet that most UNC students will take a break to browse social media. Part of this procrastination might involve skimming easily digestible stories with catchy headlines. These are known colloquially as “clickbait,” primarily designed to attract attention and advertising revenue rather than to educate and inform. While clickbait might be entertaining, its oversimplified and sensational style is ill-suited to scientific coverage and should be viewed with skepticism.


Clark Cunningham is a senior biochemistry and biology major from Chapel Hill.

Column: It’s not biology without evolution

Feb. 12 marked 206 years since the birth of Charles Darwin in 1809. While Darwin Day festivities generally bypass the United States, the theory of evolution by natural selection remains one of the bedrock principles of the life sciences.


Clark Cunningham is a senior biochemistry and biology major from Chapel Hill.

Column: Carolina squirrels: Best in the world

Upon returning from his voyage to the Galapagos Islands, Charles Darwin made what to modern academics might seem like a peculiar career move. Rather than devoting his energy to publishing what would become “On the Origin of the Species” — that would have to wait over 20 years — he returned to the respectable work of a student of nature at the time: writing extensive monographs of plants and animals. In Darwin’s case, it was barnacles of all things that captivated his attention.


Clark Cunningham is a senior biochemistry and biology major from Chapel Hill.

Column: The perks of being uncertain

To turn on the TV or go online is to be inundated with claims of certainty: This product will cure your disease, one side of an argument is true and another false, this or that will happen in the New Year.


Clark Cunningham is a senior biochemistry and biology major from Chapel Hill.

Column: Much science, very meme

When you see the word “meme,” what do you think of? For most UNC students, it is likely an online picture with a witty caption, such as the semi-literate shiba inus of “doge” fame that inspired the title of this column.