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Daniel Wiser

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Change in out-of-state rate in talks

The financially strapped UNC system could soon implement a policy that has proved controversial in the past — lifting the 18 percent cap on out-of-state and international student enrollment.


UNC-system to match degrees with jobs

Among the multitude of questions facing the UNC system and its future, members of the system’s strategic planning committee started with the basics Wednesday — how many students should universities graduate?



Media

	State & National editor Daniel Wiser moderated the first video of the Daily Tar Heel’s new “In 10” series which brings together experts to explain current news topics in about 10 minutes. Wiser sat down with UNC journalism professor Ferrel Guillory, Tom Jensen, director of Public Policy Polling, and Mitch Kokai, the director of communications for the John Locke Foundation.

Elections in 10

State & National editor Daniel Wiser moderated the first video of the Daily Tar Heel’s new “In 10” series which brings together experts to explain current news topics in about 10 minutes. Wiser sat down with UNC journalism professor Ferrel Guillory, Tom Jensen, director of Public Policy Polling, and Mitch Kokai, the director of communications for the John Locke Foundation.


News Cheat Sheet for Oct. 8, 2012

TOP STORY — A veep debate that could really matter The vice presidential debate on Thursday night has new significance after President Barack Obama’s subpar debate performance last week.


News Cheat Sheet for Oct. 1, 2012

TOP STORY — US military deaths in Afghanistan hit 2,000 after 11 years of war The Associated Press reports: “The toll has climbed steadily in recent months with a spate of attacks by Afghan army and police — supposed allies — against American and NATO troops. That has raised troubling questions about whether countries in the U.S.-led coalition in Afghanistan will achieve their aim of helping the government in Kabul and its forces stand on their own after most foreign troops depart in little more than two years.”


News Cheat Sheet for Sept. 24, 2012

TOP STORY — Republican poll analysis: Romney winning with middle-class families Politico reports that Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney holds a 14-point advantage in the latest Politico-George Washington University Battleground Poll among middle-class families, “which comprise about 54 percent of the total American electorate and usually split in their vote behavior between Republicans and Democrats.”


News Cheat Sheet for Sept. 21, 2012

TOP STORY — Romney campaign hits a financial snag While Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney’s campaign spent about $67 million last month and had about $50 million cash on hand at the start of September, President Barack Obama’s campaign had nearly $90 million on hand going into September despite spending a higher amount — $83 million — in August.


News Cheat Sheet for Sept. 17, 2012

TOP STORY: Ambassador Susan Rice: Libya Attack Not Premeditated U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Susan Rice said the attack on the American consulate in Libya was a spontaneous response to protests in Cairo, Egypt in an interview with ABC News. Rice’s account directly contradicts that of Libyan President Mohamed Yousef El-Magariaf.


News Cheat Sheet for Aug. 27, 2012

A new Washington Post-ABC News poll shows Romney at 47 percent among registered voters and Obama at 46 percent — barely changed from the deadlocked contest in early July. The economy is still likely to be the dominant issue in the 2012 election, as 72 percent of voters say the president’s handling of the economy will be a “major factor” in their vote this November.


News Cheat Sheet for Aug. 24, 2012

Cyclist Lance Armstrong could lose his seven Tour de France titles as soon as today after a protracted and bitter fight with the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency. Though the USADA treated Armstrong’s decision not to pursue arbitration in the drug case against him as an admission of guilt, he called the investigation an “unconstitutional witch hunt.”


AZ shooting sparks debate about political rhetoric

The nation continues to recover from the shocking shootings in Tucson, Ariz. that left six people dead and 14 injured, including U.S. Rep. Gabrielle Giffords. The shooting has also sparked a controversial debate about the tone of political rhetoric in the country.


Know your 112th Congress

The 112th U.S. Congress convened Jan. 5 with Republicans pledging to reverse the political and economic direction, forming a divided government that threatens gridlock.