• In the News

Doug Dubrowski

Articles

Though Chapel Hill businesses see a decrease in revenue as students go home for winter break, it is mediated by an increase in patronage by local families.

Winter is coming, but local businesses are ready

As the stress of finals week concludes and UNC students leave town, Chapel Hill businesses will look to permanent residents to fill their shops and restaurants.  Katie Loovis, vice president for external affairs at the Chapel Hill-Carrboro Chamber of Commerce, said the total economic impact of winter break is felt most strongly by restaurants and retail but is less extreme than one may think.  Although roughly 30,000 students leave for the break, Loovis said many University faculty, hospital staff and international students stay in town, meaning Chapel Hill shops continue to serve a large customer base. 


Chapel Hill looks to encourage solar power initiatives

With about 216 sunny days per year, Chapel Hill is a prime location for the popularity of solar energy to take off.  Local policies have sought to encourage the installation of solar panels and charging stations for electric vehicles to plan for a future more dependent on renewable energy. 



Media

Planning director Ben Hitchings speaks  about development agreements at Wednesday's town council meeting. 

Planning director Ben Hitchings speaks  about development agreements at Wednesday's town council meeting.