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Wednesday February 1st

Abbey Court children, UNC students find common bond in soccer

UNC class leads children in game

A volunteer ties the shoe laces of the youngest player Thursday evening. A number of sociology 273 students visit Abbey Court community every Thursday for a round of soccer with the local kids.
Buy Photos A volunteer ties the shoe laces of the youngest player Thursday evening. A number of sociology 273 students visit Abbey Court community every Thursday for a round of soccer with the local kids.

The kids of Abbey Court look forward to Thursday afternoons.

That’s when the students of Judith Blau’s social and economic justice class play soccer with them.

As part of their class, Blau’s students are required to do 30 hours of community service at the Chapel Hill and Carrboro Human Rights Center in Abbey Court, a predominantly Latino community in Carrboro.

Most of her students choose to tutor in the after-school program, but about six play soccer with the kids instead, Blau said.

“It’s rewarding,” senior Dave Dinkins said. “You’re making an impact and giving back to the community and being a role model.”

Senior Willie Walker, another one of Blau’s students, admits he isn’t very good at soccer.

“This is just my third time playing soccer,” he said. “But I like playing with the kids. Just pass them the ball and they know what to do.”

Alfonso Hernandez, the assistant teacher at Abbey Court’s after-school program, said the kids look up to the college students because they’re generally good at soccer.

Thawtu Htoo, 12, said he plays soccer every day, but he likes playing Thursday afternoons the best.

“Some of them are really good, and I wish they can teach me,” he said.

One of the “really good” players is Lucas Conway, a member of the UNC club soccer team.

Conway said he’s used to playing competitively but really likes playing with the kids.

Moving beyond the competition, soccer brings people of all different backgrounds together, said John Mulholland, who coaches the children at Abbey Court.

“Soccer is a global language,” he said.

“We have kids that speak different languages playing together, whilst parents from different countries watch with interest and a shared understanding,” Mulholland wrote in an e-mail.

Kids also benefit from the fitness and decision-making skills that develop during a game.

“It takes some of those skills when they are boxed in with the soccer ball and they need to pass it to someone,” Blau said.

It also teaches the kids cooperation and teamwork, she said.

Mulholland and sophomore Carey Averbook are starting a similar program at Rogers Road, a historically black and low-income neighborhood in Chapel Hill, as a part of the nonprofit program Play Street Soccer. The Rogers Road soccer games will happen weekly beginning March 16.

Many of Blau’s students expressed interest in getting involved there.

Blau says she hopes to set up games pitting Abbey Court against Rogers Road to expose the kids to new playmates.

Play Street Soccer’s mission is to bring soccer to communities where many kids can’t travel to club teams.

“It is a community event. It brings communities together,” Mulholland said. “Racism divides. Soccer unites.”

Contact the City Editor at city@dailytarheel.com.

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