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Thursday December 2nd

'Raging Grannies' group skeptical of Dakota Access Pipeline halt

<p>Cory Duncan, a member of the Cherokee nation,&nbsp;protests the creation of the Dakota Pipeline, in Carrboro on Saturday.&nbsp;</p>
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Cory Duncan, a member of the Cherokee nation, protests the creation of the Dakota Pipeline, in Carrboro on Saturday. 

The Obama administration ordered construction of the contentious Dakota Access Pipeline to halt Friday. 

The Dakota Access Pipeline is a 1,172-mile pipeline that will transport crude oil from North Dakota to Patoka, Illinois.

The decision comes as protesting intensified at Standing Rock, a Sioux reservation in North Dakota whose lands and water supply could be impeded by the pipeline. 

Protests against the pipeline were widespread, and included a peaceful protest in Carrboro Friday by the Triangle chapter of the Raging Grannies, a female activist group that advocates for issues such as environmental protection, racial equality and women's rights. 

“I think that it's a very, very good first move,” said Ruth Zalph, member of the Triangle chapter of the Raging Grannies, about the halt on construction. 

Though pleased with this first move, Liz Evans, another member of the Triangle chapter of the Raging Grannies, said she's skeptical. 

“It’s supposed to give the impression that something will really happen,” said Evans. “That’s not true, only partially true. Personally, I think that the effort of the native people gave someone pause somewhere.”

Zalph said the main focus of this should be on the native people.

"We need to start remembering that Native American tribes throughout the United States have been mistreated from day one," Zalph said. "Protecting their water is big."

Evans said she hoped this would be a turning point, but it will take a lot of work.

Some Grannies were even more critical of President Obama’s motivations for halting construction.

“He’s said he’s always stood with the natives; that was hogwash,” said Glenny Benjamin, another member of the Triangle chapter of the Raging Grannies. “I’m glad he put a delay on it for a couple months or weeks, it’s better than nothing, but it’s basically kicking the can down the road, hoping people will forget about it.”   

@ryansalch

city@dailytarheel.com

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