The Daily Tar Heel

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Wednesday October 27th

UNC community issues statements of support in wake of violence against Asian Americans

"The Asian American Center is here for you, because our community stands together."

Heidi Kim, an associate English professor and director of the UNC Asian American Center, poses for a portrait on Monday, Mar. 8, 2021. "I've lived through multiple waves of anti-Asian American violence," says Kim. "You start to realize there's an underlying racism that's always there."
Buy Photos Heidi Kim, an associate English professor and director of the UNC Asian American Center, poses for a portrait on Monday, Mar. 8, 2021. "I've lived through multiple waves of anti-Asian American violence," says Kim. "You start to realize there's an underlying racism that's always there."

Updated 10:15 a.m.: The Asian American Center and North Carolina Asian Americans Together hosted a virtual vigil over Zoom Wednesday night to honor the Asian Americans who have died due to increased hate against the community.

Chancellor Kevin Guskiewicz attended and spoke at the vigil.

If you or someone you know is in immediate danger, call 911. 

“I’m here tonight because I want our Asian American community here at Carolina to know that all of us stand with you in the face of this horrific violence," Guskiewicz said. "I know that many of you feel unsafe and you are worried about your family members. This hatred and violence is unacceptable and wrong.”


Members of the campus community have issued statements of support for Asian American students and members of the UNC community after eight people were killed Tuesday night in the Atlanta area of Georgia. Six of the victims were people of Asian descent. 

This act follows an increase of violence against Asian Americans across the country since the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic. The organization Stop AAPI Hate, which tracks incidents of discrimination and hate towards Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders, reported that there have been at least 3,795 acts of discrimination and hate towards Asian Americans in the past year. 

Heidi Kim, director of the Asian American Center, said in a statement that the AAC is a resource for students.

"The Asian American Center is here for you, because our community stands together," Kim said in the statement. 

Organizations across campus, including the Sonja Haynes Stone Center for Black Culture and History, the Graduate and Professional Student Federation and the Odum Institute for Research in Social Science, issued similar messages of solidarity on social media Wednesday. 

 The University has not issued a public statement about Tuesday's violence. On March 9, however, the University issued a statement condemning the increased violence against Asian Americans in a campus email from Chancellor Kevin Guskiewicz, Provost Bob Blouin and Interim Chief Diversity Officer Sibby Anderson-Thompkins on March 9. 

"We stand in unity with our Asian American community and denounce hatred, bigotry and racism in all its forms," they said in the email. 

The email encouraged students to reach out to the Office for Diversity and Inclusion. 

"We will continue to look for ways to support each other through these horrific crimes and also keep celebrating the richness, diversity, and history of Asian America—because that work doesn’t stop either," Kim said in the statement.


Resources for students

Kim listed resources including Counseling and Psychological Services and the Employee Assistance Program in the statement from the AAC. 

The Asian American Center's website has a resources page, with information on mental health resources and ways to report hate crimes. Here are some of the resources listed: 

Mental health help lines, available 24/7:

Mental health resources:

Resources for reporting hate crimes at UNC: 

  • Report an incident form through the Equal Opportunity and Compliance Office. The EOC Office handles reports of discrimination and harassment on the basis of "age, color, disability, genetic information, national origin, race, religion, sex (including gender, gender expression, or gender identity), sexual orientation, and veteran status."
  • Contact the University Ombuds Office. The Ombuds Office is a "confidential, impartial, informal, and independent resource" for staff, faculty and students at UNC. The Ombuds Office are a resource for consultation, listening, guidance on next steps and provide referrals. The Ombuds Office does not make decisions or changes to University policy or rules. 

university@dailytarheel.com

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