The Carrboro Board of Aldermen discussed numerous conditions for the proposed development on Old Fayetteville Drive on Tuesday, Oct. 22, 2019.

Carrboro Board of Aldermen talks name change, more diversity at Tuesday's meeting

For the first time since a 1969 bill changed the board from Commissioners to Aldermen, Carrboro may have a new name for its governing body. At the meeting, town lawmakers directed staff to prepare a resolution for next week changing the board’s name to “Town Council.” 


Carrboro Board of Aldermen

Carrboro’s Board of Aldermen is responsible for guiding the town of Carrboro and making policy decisions. Carrboro has a council/manager form of government, which means the aldermen are responsible for the town’s legislative responsibilities. There are six members of the board, along with the mayor who leads it. The current mayor is Lydia Lavelle.

The board is advised by the town manager, along with a number of other advisory boards and committees. These are often run by aldermen. They deal with issues such as economic development, climate change and human services.

Board meetings are held on the 1st and 3rd Tuesdays, work sessions on 2nd Tuesdays, and public hearings on 4th Tuesdays at 7:30 p.m. at the Town Hall at 301 W. Main Street.

See who’s on the board, read upcoming agendas or view meeting minutes.

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How much money have the candidates in Chapel Hill-Carrboro races spent?

As the Nov. 5 elections approach, candidates have been campaigning hard, going to events on UNC's campus, in churches and other community spaces. Besides what a candidate believes and advocates, there is one other thing the public wonders: how much did their campaign cost and raise? The numbers vary widely across the Chapel Hill-Carrboro races, and they've changed a lot since last year. “Some state and local campaigns don't cost a lot,” Suzanne Globetti, a teaching associate professor of political science at UNC, said. “Others, especially those that rely on television for campaign advertising, end up spending quite a lot.”