Carrboro Board of Aldermen

Carrboro’s Board of Aldermen is responsible for guiding the town of Carrboro and making policy decisions. Carrboro has a council/manager form of government, which means the aldermen are responsible for the town’s legislative responsibilities. There are six members of the board, along with the mayor who leads it. The current mayor is Lydia Lavelle.

The board is advised by the town manager, along with a number of other advisory boards and committees. These are often run by aldermen. They deal with issues such as economic development, climate change and human services.

Board meetings are held on the 1st and 3rd Tuesdays, work sessions on 2nd Tuesdays, and public hearings on 4th Tuesdays at 7:30 p.m. at the Town Hall at 301 W. Main Street.

See who’s on the board, read upcoming agendas or view meeting minutes.

The Daily Tar Heel tags stories to make it easier for you to find our more about topics you care about. Consider it a Wikipedia for all things UNC.


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Carrboro aldermen gain new diversity through Michelle Johnson

Michelle Johnson, unofficially the newest member of the Carrboro Board of Aldermen, promises to ensure a minority voice on the board and offer a perspective that is diverse in other ways. Johnson, a black woman, will serve on the seven-member, predominantly white board alongside incumbents Lydia Lavelle and Dan Coleman, who were both re-elected.


Tethering the public voice: Carrboro’s tethering ban overlooked public input and concerns

The Carrboro Board of Aldermen had dogs’ — but maybe not the public’s — best interests in mind when it voted last week to ban tethering. While the ban will surely prevent some cases of inhumane treatment of dogs, it could have easily been fortified with a public hearing that the board decided to skip. The outright ban now runs the risk of acting as a tax on dog owners who must expand fences to keep their dogs unattended outside.


Carrboro re-examines anti-lingering ordinance

For day laborers in Carrboro, the corner of Jones Ferry and Davie roads is the gateway to finding work every day. And though workers can only linger near the intersection between 5 a.m. and 11 a.m. based on a 2007 ordinance, Carrboro’s Board of Aldermen discussed on Tuesday plans to change that.


Pug Thadeus (aka the dog in the pictures) 
is put in a harness in his front yard by his owner Allison Tarr on Tuesday, September 13 on Dogwood Lane in Chapel Hill

Carrboro bans dog tethering

Dog owners can no longer tie their dogs to a stationary object after the Carrboro Board of Aldermen unanimously passed an anti-tethering ordinance Tuesday.


Cathy, six year old Rachel, seven year old Isabella and Cray Gun walk to Carrboro Elementary School from their house on Hillsborough street  on Thursday morning. Their house was picked up and relocated and Mr. and Mrs. Gunn worried about the reduction of privacy if a road for the library  was built adjacent to their house.

Carrboro residents relieved library site rejected

Cray and Kathy Gunn eagerly supported plans for a free-standing library for Carrboro — until they learned the site rezoning would redirect traffic past their home. After they voiced complaints but failed to stop Carrboro’s Board of Aldermen from approving in April the lot’s rezoning, they hired a lawyer to represent their concerns.


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Carrboro looks for new town manager

Carrboro government officials hope to have a new town manager by the end of the year. Former Carrboro Town Manager Steve Stewart retired Aug. 1 after holding the position for 8 years — prompting the search for a replacement.