Chapel Hill-Carrboro City Schools administrators attend RtI Innovations Conference

Six CHCCS district administrators participated in the Response to Instruction Conference in Salt Lake City, Utah, last week. The conference celebrated its 15th year and consisted of participants from multiple disciplines including general classroom teachers, building administrators, district administrators, special education teachers, school psychologists and university faculty. Each CHCCS representative attended a two-day interactive workshop at the conference.

Chapel Hill-Carrboro City Schools

Chapel Hill-Carrboro City Schools is one of two public schools systems in Orange County. The system is run by the CHCCS Board of Education, which is comprised of seven elected officials who hold four-year terms. Under the board is the superintendent. The current superintendent is Tom Forcella.

The district includes 11 elementary schools, four middle schools, four high schools, a middle college with Durham Technical Community College and a school for children at UNC Hospitals. These schools serve more than 12,000 students across Orange County.

Learn more about the district's Board of Education here

Browse board meeting agendas and videos here

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Marilyn Metzler, middle, overlooks as Ben Swain, Eli Broverman and Raghav Swaminathan. DTH/Julie Crimmins

Chapel Hill-Carrboro City Schools losing elective courses

Eleven students labeled brightly colored body outlines with the German words for different body parts last week.Later, their teacher, Marilyn Metzler, joked in German with one student who told her she had a “bad face.”Smith Middle School’s class is the last remaining middle school German class in Chapel Hill-Carrboro City Schools — and it won’t continue next year.


School district expects layoffs

Another round of layoffs is expected at Chapel Hill-Carrboro City Schools due to the second significant cut to the district’s budget in two years.District administrators expect its budget to shrink by several million dollars next school year, Superintendent Neil Pedersen said.