CITY & COUNTY


2/2/2020 6:48pm

Carlos Ramirez is taking over as principal of Cedar Ridge High School this week. Photo courtesy of Orange County Schools.

Meet the new principal of Cedar Ridge High School

“I would love to see an articulated program that runs from elementary, to middle, to high school,” Ramirez said. “I’ve seen it in action when I worked as an educator in Texas, and it’s quite a powerful thing to get students as young as fifth graders started on the IB track.”


1/30/2020 11:30pm

UPDATE unc system money transfer-01.png

Behind closed doors: UNC System concealed $74,999 deal's role in Confederate payoff

A secretive $74,999 payment has remained a standout question in a pair of backdoor deals between the UNC System and the North Carolina Division Sons of Confederate Veterans Inc. two months ago. The settlement agreement was announced nearly a month after its Nov. 21 signing as a commitment by the SCV to limit its practices and displays on UNC System property. The Daily Tar Heel has obtained new details from sources with first-hand knowledge of the deal, revealing that the $74,999 served as a crucial payoff in a larger courtroom collusion effort between the state’s higher-education authority and a politically-active, pro-Confederate group. 


1/29/2020 10:20pm

North Carolina General Assembly building in Raleigh on Wednesday, Jan. 29, 2020.

Medicaid expansion and teacher pay have held up N.C.’s budget. Why are they important?

“It’s an expensive program. I mean, Governor Cooper’s budget, his projections are over the first two years it would cost just over $6 billion, for the federal state share, just for two years.” Looking into the details of the Medicaid expansion and teacher pay policies reveal these programs have tangible effects for large populations of North Carolina, including the fact that they are primary reasons the state budget is unable to pass through the general assembly.


1/28/2020 10:24pm

The Christopher and William Barbee Family Cemetery pictured on Jan. 24, 2020. The cemetery was active in the 18th and 19th century and where William Barbee and his relatives were buried. Nearly 100 enslaved people are buried in unmarked graves.

Unmarked graves of enslaved people demonstrate Chapel Hill's dark past

“With all the intense emotional reaction over the fall of an abstract monument to slave-owning soldiers, you might think people might be up in arms about actual bodies in the ground that have gone unremembered.” About three miles from UNC’s campus, nearly 100 enslaved people are buried in unmarked  graves at a historic family cemetery. Located only a short walk from the Rizzo Center, the exact details of the cemetery’s ownership and maintenance were unclear to the University when The Daily Tar Heel began investigating the property. Currently, an on-site marker states that the cemetery contains approximately 120 graves but makes no mention of the 100 enslaved people buried there.