The Daily Tar Heel

Serving the students and the University community since 1893

Tuesday September 21st

2020 Coronavirus Outbreak


The N.C. Museum of Art reopened on Wednesday, Sept. 9, 2020 with Covid19 restrictions after Governor Roy Cooper's Phase 2.5 eased public restrictions. Photo courtesy of the N.C. Museum of Art.

Now allowed to reopen, museums develop a broad array of plans to welcome back patrons

As North Carolina moves into Phase 2.5, museums in the Triangle area are able to reopen at limited capacity. The North Carolina Museum of Art is now open, with the North Carolina Museum of Sciences opening soon. Facing lost revenue due to the pandemic, these museums have come up with innovative ways to share the museum experience virtually and some are now opening their doors once more to visitors in person.

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Flicka Bateman, director, and Eh Moo, administrative assistant, pose for a portrait with members of a refugee family outside of the Refugee Support Center in Carrboro on Tuesday, Sept. 8, 2020. The family members are holding bags of diapers, which Bateman said the Center distributes monthly that families can spend up to $80 a month on.

Local organizations assist refugees through COVID-19 pandemic

The Refugee Support Center serves approximately 900 refugees who primarily primarily come from Burma, the Democratic Republic of the Congo and Syria. Flicka Bateman, the center's director, said many refugees work in industries that have lost a lot of business and have laid off employees, such as hotels, restaurants and housekeeping. 

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DTH Photo Illustration. Only two weeks after students were expected to leave their on-campus housing and attend classes remotely, students living off-campus are struggling with internet accessibility.

Off-campus students struggle with internet access during a remote semester

Several off-campus students at UNC are struggling with internet connectivity issues this fall. Since the pandemic caused undergraduate classes to go online, access to internet has become essential. Jeff Sural, director of the North Carolina Broadband Infrastructure Office, said the influx of college students and residents using the internet in quarantine can result in slower internet connections for those in the area. UNC is offering students a $200 internet supplement award through the Office of Scholarships and Student Aid to help students purchase internet this semester, UNC Media Relations said in an email.

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With many UNC students both on and off campus being tested for COVID-19, there can be some confusion as to the reporting process of the results. For those tested through Campus Health Services, their tests are sent to LabCorp, a clinical laboratory company that runs various tests, including screening for COVID-19, but the route is less clear for those who are tested off campus.  Graphic by Matthew Meyers.

How are COVID-19 tests reported at UNC?

Students both on and off campus are being tested for COVID-19 after clusters were identified in 13 residence halls since UNC's reopening. But after the test is administered, where does it go? UNC Media Relations said in a statement that tests performed at Campus Health Services are sent to LabCorp, a clinical laboratory company that runs various tests, including screening for COVID-19. As for tests administered off campus, the route is less clear. Orange County Community Relations Director Todd McGee said in a statement that test results are not typically reported directly to the county.

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Delivery driver Daisy Otutuoloro prepares for a food delivery through Shipt in Raleigh, NC on Saturday, Aug. 29, 2020. Many unemployed workers in the Triangle have been turning to gig economy platforms such as these to supplement income lost due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Chapel Hill food delivery app economy sees influx of student workers amid pandemic

UNC students are flocking to delivery platforms for employment after COVID-19 put their other job opportunities on hold, but it works better for some than for others. One UNC senior transitioned between delivery companies, from driving to taking on a marketing position. Another UNC graduate took a delivery job after his full-time position was delayed. “As more people have turned to these applications or nontraditional work more generally, it has definitely had impacts on those who have already been reliant over a longer period of time on gig work,” Hilary Greenberg, a research associate for the Aspen Institute Future of Work Initiative, said.

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