CORRECTIONS


1/9/2019 10:44pm

Maya Little speaks before a shouting crowd during a protest against Chancellor Carol Folt and the Board of Trustees' proposal for Silent Sam's relocation in the Peace and Justice Plaza on Monday, Dec. 3, 2018. 

Editorial: TA strike took advantage of students

"For this group of TAs to decide, after their last paycheck had been delivered, to hold the grades of their students hostage to make a statement is a cowardly move."


11/29/2018 12:18am

“We’re an old university, and we have hundreds of millions of dollars in deferred maintenance,” said Chancellor Carol Folt at the November BOT meeting. “You hit a point when old buildings get old. We’re trying to deal with that. We can’t rely fully on the state.”
President of the Graduate and Professional School Federation and Student Body President said the University introduced the new fee controversially, undermining student feedback which typically guides the early stages of fee creation.
Curtis Love, 45, from Alamance County, Richard Smith, 42, from Greensboro, and  Carnell Bass, 55, from Durham on Nov 28, 2018 working on brick construction in between Davis library and the student union. 

Was student input considered in this $65 increase in student fees?

An increase in student fees was officially ratified by the Board of Trustees in November, and now faces approval by the Board of Governors.  The new fee of approximately $65 seeks to account for renovations in classrooms and labs. However, student government leaders claim the fee was proposed without a considerable student input. The fee also takes the place of other fees that are being diminished or terminated altogether. Here is the process the fee must go through to be official, and what both sides have to say about it. 


9/20/2018 12:05am

Student Body President Savannah Putnam attends a special meeting of the Board of Trustees the morning of Aug. 28 at Paul J. Rizzo Conference Center.

SBP Savannah Putnam's 'Catch-22': Power dynamics in the BOT

When the Board of Trustees huddled in closed session earlier this month, awaiting instruction on how to proceed on the delicate Confederate monument issue, Savannah Putnam met with them.  As the SBP, her job is to act as a liaison between the students and administration. Yet despite her status as a voting ex-officio member of the BOT, she was asked to leave a conversation which took place before the official special meeting dates of both the BOT and BOG.


9/14/2018 6:30pm

Vice Chancellor Winston Crisp spoke at the University Affairs Committee meeting on Jan. 30. Photo by Cori Patrick.

'What a mess. Won’t be texting': More messages from UNC post-Silent Sam revealed

On Friday, WRAL released texts and emails exchanged between UNC faculty and administration before and shortly after Confederate monument Silent Sam fell.  In the  messages, faculty and administration discussed what was happening at the protest, expressed shock when it was pulled down and coordinated media strategy. They also discussed their messaging in reaction to the demonstration, with some saying that they should be clear in expressing how wrong it was.  In the aftermath, messages were also exchanged about student government, and their subsequent response to monument's toppling. 


9/12/2018 6:50pm

UNC Chancellor Carol Folt walks with Mark Merritt, vice chancellor and general council of UNC, through the Gaylord Opryland Resort & Conference Center in Nashville, Tenn. during a lunch break Aug. 16, 2017.

Folt, McCracken receive dozens of emails and voicemails after toppling of Silent Sam

Following a public records request by the DTH for communications to the Chancellor's Office on Aug. 20 and 21, the University released 18 emails, one text and approximately 150 voicemails. The DTH has also received 11 emails sent to UNC Police Chief Jeff McCracken.  Many of those who contacted the chancellor were upset about the events that took place on Aug. 20, and revoked their support of the University -- emotionally, physically and monetarily. Others questioned the state of the University, the community and worried over what would happen next. 


9/3/2018 9:21pm

Photo courtesy of Ross Boyce, studying malaria.

Off-campus work-study jobs seeming harder to get, and keep, after payment changes

Senior Morgan Holder is in love with her work-study job at the North Carolina Botanical Garden. In a world of unpaid internships and menial jobs with long hours, students like Holder look to get paid doing what they love. For many students, work study offers a unique way to make livable wages and gain experience in fields related to their interests. But new changes to salaries is disincentivizing employers from taking on work-study students. So what's worth more: student experience or cutting costs?