The Daily Tar Heel

Serving the students and the University community since 1893

Saturday September 18th

Arts & Culture


Will Melfi believes that the best years of his life are yet to come.

Column: Living life without expectations

"The one good thing I have gained from this pandemic is the expectation to have no expectations. I have torn up my life plan. If I get married at 30, great. If I don’t, you can expect me to be doing whatever the hell it is I want to be doing."

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Hiroyuki Sanada, left, as Scorpion/Hanzo Hasashi and Joe Taslim as Sub-Zero/Bi-Han in New Line Cinema’s action adventure “Mortal Kombat." Photo courtesy of Warner Bros./TNS

Column: New 'Mortal Kombat' film adapts the games faithfully

When you think of Mortal Kombat, what comes to mind for many are the grotesque fatalities that made the series famous. Now adapted as a film once again, the movie shows a series of battles in the infamous tournament. From Sub-Zero to Scorpion, the film takes views on a nostalgic ride as if they were in front of their screens playing their friends.

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Alan S. Kim, left, Steven Yeun, Noel Cho and Yeri Han in A24's "Minari." Photo courtesy of David Bornfriend/A24/TNS)

What to Watch: Oscars Edition

The 2021 Oscars awards will showcase a diverse selection of films April 25th. Some notable films that the Academy nominated are Judas and the Black Messiah, Nomadland and Sound of Metal. With theaters being closed this year, viewers can catch these films or various streaming platforms like Netflix, Hulu, Amazon Prime and HBO Max. 

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A 1-year-old Victoria Song with her mother and grandmother during a trip to Washington, D.C. in 2002. Photo courtesy of Victoria Song.

Op-ed: To my Asian grandmother

"It has taken the lives of Xiaojie Tan, Daoyou Feng, Hyun Jung Grant, Soon Chung Park, Suncha Kim, Yong Ae Yue and Delania Yaun for me to realize I have robbed myself of stories of my grandmother’s life."

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An Orange County exhibit opening virtually on Thursday will look at the ways that dating has changed since the beginning of the 20th century. Photo courtesy of Courtney Smith.

Orange County Historical Museum will take you on a date, 20th century style

“I think the most exciting part is seeing the way love is portrayed in different decades, because now I feel like love is portrayed in a solid, social media sense, and you see this idealized version of love and you forget what it was like before Instagram and Tinder and Bumble and all those dating apps,” Ainsley Cogburn said. “The natural progression of love throughout the decades is really interesting to see.”

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