The Daily Tar Heel

Serving the students and the University community since 1893

Monday December 5th

Arts & Culture


NYC Photos on Display at Open Eye

To coincide with the anniversary of the Sept. 11 attacks, Carrboro's Open Eye Cafe is featuring a new exhibit called "NYC Photography Memorial." But the photos don't focus on what's missing in New York -- they focus on the diversity and spirit that remains. The pictures, taken by UNC alumnus Joshua Corbin, showcase the elegance and personality of New York City and shy away from the type of graphic images used constantly by the media since the World Trade Center attacks.

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Writer/Director Andrew Niccol Jumbles Pieces in Potentially Powerful 'Simone'

"Simone" 2 Stars All the parts are in place for a good movie -- maybe even a great movie. But the pieces never come together; "Simone" just doesn't work. No matter the outcome, the comedy's intriguing premise can't be blamed. Out of luck, Hollywood director Viktor Taransky (Al Pacino) needs a star for his unfinished picture. When a dying computer wizard gives the director a program to make a perfectly lifelike digital actress, Taransky's back on top.

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'Tadpole' Makes Mediocre Attempt at Age-Old Story

"Tadpole" 3 Stars A story about a 40-year-old woman sleeping with her best friend's teenage stepson seems perfect for a cheesy Lifetime movie-of-the-week. But when such a story is written and acted as well as "Tadpole," it's difficult to even consider them in the same league. "Tadpole" refers to Oscar, played by newcomer Aaron Stanford, who is returning home for Thanksgiving from his ritzy prep school as the film opens.

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File-Sharing Giants Wrestle With Legal Issues

Now that the residence halls are again filled with students, the spotlight has once again been placed on Internet file-sharing. More accurately, the focus now rests on the limitations the University has placed upon downloading. While the University has written these new rules due to moral and legal issues, a representative from the popular program LimeWire insist that the enterprise is completely legal. Greg Bildson, chief operating officer and chief technology officer for LimeWire, was quick to lay down what he sees as a misunderstanding.

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Local Band Roars Off Into Sunset With Go! Farewell

Milo Go! Studios Friday, Aug. 23 4 Stars Chapel Hill band Milo bid farewell to the live music scene Aug. 23. As band members prepare to leave for other states and occupations, they took time to give their fans a preview of their upcoming and last LP at Go! Room 4. With openers Spiraling and Pilot Round the Sun, Milo played a lengthy and intense show to an audience that increased in size and energy throughout the evening.

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Media Mayhem

Their screens glow inanimate against concrete walls, an Ethernet connection bringing UNC students swift access to all the music, movies, photographs and information that the Internet has to offer. But one eternal ethical question remains -- does ability beget the right? An interlacing of legalese, protection laws, copyright acts and disputes over the rights of the consumer and the rights of the artist can turn an attempt to responsibly download the fruits of other people's labors into a swamp of sour grapes and rotten apples.

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Texans Take Cradle Crowd Into the Flatlands

The Flatlanders Cat's Cradle Tuesday, Aug. 27 4 Stars Years ago, the Flatlanders were young, hip and at the top of their musical game. Tuesday night at Cats Cradle, they proved that they still have what it takes. From the first soulful twang of the acoustic guitar to the last hit on the drums, the band put on a show to remember.

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Studies Question Musical Downloads' Effects on Sales

Years after the forced shutdown of Napster, controversy still smokes over whether people who share music online are modern-day Robin Hoods or petty thieves. The Recording Industry Association of America, which represents the interests of many record labels, believes the latter. According to the RIAA's midyear "snapshot" of the music industry, overall CD shipments have decreased by 7 percent in the first half of 2002. Shipments have dropped from $5.93 billion in the first half of 2001 to $5.53 billion in the first half of this year.

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Spoon Survives Rock Abyss With Research-Worthy Release

Spoon Kill the Moonlight 4 Stars Some albums warrant investigation. But only great albums require research. Spoon understands the science of rock 'n' roll, where listening isn't a pastime, it's required study. In researching the band's new album, Kill the Moonlight, the bass-heavy, reverb-laden soundscapes offer the listener completely different messages through headphones, cars and stereos. The new focus on guitarist/vocalist Britt Daniel's angular melodies and the band's masterful control of space between notes clearly reveals a band in top form.

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Ackland Exhibit Illuminates Islam

The most recent installment in the Ackland Art Museum's Five Faiths Project, titled "Word and Worship: Approaching Islam Through Art," is attracting viewers despite a contentious campus debate swirling around religion's role at the University. But with such a heightened opportunity for religious dialogue, the staff at the Ackland wouldn't have it any other way. Andy Berner, director of communications at the Ackland, said the point of the project is to educate the public, and particularly students in North Carolina's public schools, about different religions.

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Lack of Space to Hurt Shows, Budgets

Student-run theater companies will be scaling down their productions and bracing for tighter budgets this year as campus construction projects shrink available stage space. Theatergoers can expect to see smaller casts, simpler scenery and possibly higher ticket prices as UNC acting groups vie for performance sites. Pauper Players and Company Carolina are both dealing with the temporary loss of the Cabaret, now off-limits as the Student Union prepares for further renovations, scheduled for completion in late 2003.

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Looking Beyond the Hill

They're confident, comfortable and commanding -- but if the members of Sankofa are going to make it big, they will need more than just ambition. And thankfully they've got it. Anyone remotely plugged into the pulse of the Chapel Hill music scene has heard -- or at least heard of -- the funky hip-hop rhythms of Sankofa. The group's style is unique, its sound intense, its talents soaring. But being a powerful local sensation doesn't guarantee that Sankofa will just step into being a national icon.

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Construction Limits Space For Theater Productions

Campus construction has sent some student theater groups in search of performance sites for the upcoming semester, with several popular venues unavailable because of renovations. As the Student Union prepares to begin Phases II and III of its three-phase renovation project, its underground Cabaret is closed for use. The Union's Great Hall is scheduled to close next semester. Ryan Donahoe, director of events planning for the Union, said the closing of the two sites has put a strain on student theater groups, which often have used both venues to stage their performances.

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Deep Dish Does Lots With Little in 'Lesson'

Sure, it's housed in University Mall, and its theater is the size of a boutique -- but the Deep Dish Theater Company's production of "A Lesson Before Dying" aims for the stars. And it's pretty on-target. Adapted by Romulus Linney from Ernest Gaines' National Book Award-winning novel, the play far outshines its mall surroundings. A tale of Deep South race relations, capital punishment and religion, it's a bold choice to kick off Deep Dish's second season.

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Giant Puppets to Tell Story of Sky, Earth

Today, giant puppets will overtake UNC's Forest Theatre in the first of 12 performances by the Paper Hand Puppet Intervention. For the third consecutive year, a troupe of puppeteers and puppets of myriad shapes and sizes will present a story to students, families, faculty and other attendees. "Listen to the Sky," this year's show, will detail the creation of the sun, movement through the seasons and the relationship between humanity and nature.

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Local Music Scene Offers Variety of Genres, Venues

In terms of music, Chapel Hill is as much adjective as noun. The city's music scene is nationally known, the name a veritable promise of quality. For diehard fans or music novices in Chapel Hill, options abound on any given night in any given genre. Cat's Cradle This local legend is known across the country, having helped launch the careers of acts like Ben Folds. The Cradle sustains Chapel Hill and regularly brings in great mid-major names of all genres.

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Museums' Exhibits, Special Programs Entice Visitors

It has been hypothesized that visiting museums is becoming a lost and outdated art, especially among the younger generation. But many museums in the area disagree and open their doors to museum virgins and veterans alike, sharing permanent collections and visiting exhibitions. The Ackland Art Museum, located on the UNC campus, is one of many places to strike a pensive pose and contemplate brush strokes. "The Ackland is always free to students; in fact, it's free to everyone," said Andy Berner, assistant director of development at the Ackland Art Museum.

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WXYC Must Pay Royalties For Internet Simulcasting

The message has come through loud and clear for WXYC, UNC's student-run radio station, and anyone involved in Web casting: Time to pay up.The new royalty rates for the transmission of programming online by commercial and noncommercial broadcasters per performance are 0.07 and 0.02 cents, respectively. A performance is defined as one person listening to one song.

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