The Daily Tar Heel

Serving the students and the University community since 1893

Monday December 5th

Arts & Culture


Budget May Hurt Arts Promotions, Not Shows

Despite the financial setbacks of pending state budget cuts, UNC shows will go on. Because of funding from outside sources, performances and exhibitions by University arts programs are set for the upcoming school year. But the publicity and promotion of those events will be hindered by the cuts that inevitably will be made this year to the University's budget. Arts Carolina, an organization charged with aiding such promotion, could be cut entirely.

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UNC Groups Give Students A Variety of Ways to Play

While incoming students might take UNC's strong programs, good music and competitive sports for granted, the high quality of performance arts might just blindside them. Numerous theater companies have been created over the years. The most renowned group is PlayMakers Repertory Company, now entering its 27th season. It is a professional, nonprofit organization dedicated to the exploration of drama and to the relationship between itself and the community. PlayMakers features a resident company that includes both faculty members and people outside the university.

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Summer Heat Brings Out Stars

The mercury still climbs to 90, and the humidity is heavy in the air as ever, but summer is over. It hasn't died in vain. Unlike a lot of the past few summer breaks, this year's lazy days saw more than their fair share of highlights. Popcorn flicks suddenly had more kernels for thought, and big-release CDs weren't throw-aways again. This summer belonged to some terrific big dogs, and they're going to take a bow. -

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ArtsCenter Survives Budget Woes

With budget cuts plaguing the state, many institutions that receive state funding are facing difficult times -- including the Carrboro ArtsCenter. But that doesn't mean it will be shutting down any time soon. Judi Cooper, developing and marketing director at the ArtsCenter, said that despite economic troubles she doesn't expect major changes in the schedule, programming and focus of the ArtsCenter.

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'K-19' Dives for U.S., Russia Cooperation

"K-19: The Widowmaker" Four Stars Cursed from the beginning, K-19, Russia's first nuclear ballistic missile submarine was fated for the dry docks. The film, however, has a more uplifting future. Director Kathryn Bigelow ("Strange Days," "Point Break"), successfully captures both the emotional and political facets of the Cold War in "K-19: The Widowmaker." Set in 1961, a time of fragile relations between the United States and Russia, a nuclear holocaust lies on the horizon.

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Dave Matthews Band Matures on 6th Studio Album With Mellow, Introspective Rock

Dave Matthews Band Busted Stuff Three Stars If you're one of those Dave fans who was let down by Everyday and is still ranting about the elusiveness of the Lillywhite Sessions, calm down. But don't forget to have a drink and live it up while you're young. That's what Dave Matthews would want you to do, or such is the general idea behind Busted Stuff. Dave Matthews Band's sixth full-length studio album, it is a more-than-welcome follow-up to the forced-sounding Everyday.

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Arachnophobes Flee From 'Eight'

"Eight Legged Freaks" One Star Pain, sorrow, empathy and disappointment are just a few of the many emotions felt when characters die in great films. But, in "Eight Legged Freaks," the death of anyone with more than a two-minute cameo leads to an entirely different set of emotions, including relief, exuberance and satisfaction.

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Flaming Lips Battle Weirdness And Win

Flaming Lips Yoshimi Battles the Pink Robots Four Stars Some of the most innovative, impressive and important rock music isn't brewing in the usual scenes of New York, Los Angeles, Chicago, Seattle, San Francisco or Austin -- no, it's coming out of Oklahoma City. This unlikely Midwestern hot spot is home to the Flaming Lips, purveyors of trippy, dreamy rock that has always seemed to float alongside the clouds more than it has stayed down to earth.

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School Ends; Arts Continue

As the summer draws to a close and the town of Chapel Hill quiets down during the lull between summer session and fall semester, those few students left lurking in the wings may find themselves at a loss for things to do. But look no further, weary soldiers -- the final summer issue of The Daily Tar Heel is happy to present your guide to leisure, arts and entertainment style. Here is a summary of a few choice events that will be coming your way.

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Aussie Rockers Meld Beatles, Nirvana Influences on Debut

The Vines Highly Evolved 3 Stars Before listening to the Vines' debut full-length album, Highly Evolved, there are a few things to note. Despite any British press hype that might have trickled overseas in the last month (since the album's European release), the Vines are not the Nirvana of the new millennium. Sydney is not Seattle, and this is not 1991. There's no denying that this Australian foursome stirs up memories of Bleach and Nevermind with intense, metallic guitars that screech at just the right moments.

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Service Program Works to Better Lives of Kenyans

A few UNC students are giving up the luxuries of American life to help some of Kenya's residents who do not have the luxury to expect that they will live through the day. These students are volunteers working on behalf of Carolina for Kibera Inc., a service program developed by former UNC student Rye Barcott during his senior year and now based in the University's Center for International Studies.

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"Reign of Fire" Extinguished by B-Movie Plot, Mediocre Acting

Lions and tigers and bears, so what? In the new film "Reign of Fire," man-eating dragons and their combustible breath are the true terrors. Quinn Abercromby, a wee London lad, encounters the first of the long-dormant beasts when he goes beneath the earth's surface to visit his mother, a construction engineer working underground. Before his eyes, a creature bursts through the tunnels and effectively situates itself in pole position on the food chain.

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Chili Peppers Lose Their Heat On Mellow, Unpolished Album

Red Hot Chili Peppers By The Way 2 Stars A softer, mellower Californication, the Red Hot Chili Peppers' new album By The Way, can be described best as a set of radio-friendly B-sides. Sounding more like an extension of the group's last album, it might be more appropriately titled, By The Way, Here's The Rest of Californication. Warmly embracing the pop genre, the Red Hot Chili Peppers seem to have lost their punk edge.

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'Road' on Fast Track To Oscars

Road to Perdition 5 Stars In the antithesis to the typical summer blockbuster, Sam Mendes, director of "American Beauty," doles out a second dose of dysfunction in "Road to Perdition." It's 1931, an Irish mob is dominating the Midwestern scene, and the name of the game is perdition: the loss of the soul, eternal damnation or, simply, hell.

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Funny 'Men in Black II' Doesn't Surprise

Men In Black II 3 Stars Just when you think it's safe to go outside, leave it to Hollywood to threaten the safety of Earth in a new, horrific way. During times like this, there's nothing to do but thank goodness for guys like Will Smith and Tommy Lee Jones.

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Sonic Youth Successfully Starts Anew

Sonic Youth Murray Street 4 Stars Sonic Youth has never failed to experiment, to try new things, to follow calm with chaos and vice versa and to defy expectations in general. It's too bad that on the band's new album, Murray Street, the group experiments further instead of sticking with something that was about as good as could have been hoped for.

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Public Art Committee Awaits Final Decision From Chancellor

On June 3, the UNC Public Art Planning Committee sent a proposal to Chancellor James Moeser that could change the look of the campus. The committee is awaiting Moeser's decision either to accept or reject its budget recommendations for an official public art program at the University. "My understanding is no decisions have been made regarding this proposal," said Director of News Services Mike McFarland. As the proposal states, the program would not serve merely as a tool for decoration. Its primary goal would be to enrich campus life.

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NCMA Cuts Hours Due to Budget

The N.C. Museum of Art has come across some rough terrain. But as always, the show must go on. Complications in the state budget have resulted in the museum's Board of Trustees approving a reduction in public hours from 51 hours a week to 39.

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'Altar Boys' Film Original in Plot, Use of Comics

"The Dangerous Lives of Altar Boys" 3 Stars No, its not what you're thinking. There are no scandalous church coverups of sexual abuse or clergymen lurking in the shadows. "The Dangerous Lives of Altar Boys" is simply the story of rebellious eighth-grade Catholic schoolboys and their fight against small-town boredom. Set in the mid-1970s, the film deals with adolescent male friendship, focusing on the bond between Francis Doyle (Emile Hirsch) and Tim Sullivan (Kieran Culkin).

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