The Daily Tar Heel

Serving the students and the University community since 1893

Saturday December 3rd

Arts & Culture


Dollywood, Appalachia Combine

Is it better to burn out than to fade away? Or better still to avoid the question entirely and change the rules? Dolly Parton's new album, Halos and Horns, adds to a trinity of bluegrass-heavy albums that marks a drastic change from the sequined country classics that made her the reigning queen of Nashville country in the '70s and '80s. The success of a genre relegated to the mountains, wholly due to last year's "O Brother, Where Art Thou?" soundtrack, makes Parton's return to her roots less of a fading away.

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Eno Festival Raises Money for River

Local Residents who are dissapointed about the lack of Fourth of July fireworks due to the state's budget crisis this year should have no fear: The Festival for the Eno will be exhibiting its own kind of patriotic display -- waterworks. "The festival is a celebration of the river, but more than that it is a celebration of the spirit of the river," said Assistant Coordinator Charlie Helms. "People join together for the weekend to enjoy the natural beauty of our country through music and camaraderie." This year marks the 23rd anniversary of the festival.

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Luna Performs Live at the Cradle

Luna Saturday, June 22 Cat's Cradle The fearless foursome that constitutes the band Luna gave the Cat's Cradle audience almost everything they could have asked for. Members Dean Wareham (vocals, guitar), Sean Eden (guitar), Britta Phillips (bass) and Lee Wall (drums) dabbled in the artistry of the band's decade-long history. Incorporating songs from 1994's Bewitched, arguably its best album to date, with tunes from Penthouse and its latest release Romantica, to name a few, Luna revealed its "hard" rock side.

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Mayflies USA: Walking in a Straight Line

The Mayflies USA Walking in a Straight Line The Mayflies USA's newest album, Walking in a Straight Line, is perfect for sweating the summer away. Bouncing poppy lyrics are layered over energetic drums and guitar riffs. The songs are light, simple and perfect for lounging around. They might even be compared to the simple forms of early rock 'n' roll, which the band cites as an influence.

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'Red Church' a Scary Mountain Tale

A horror story is all the more effective when one can feel enough for its primary players to hope that they survive the night. Scott Nicholson's new novel "The Red Church" gets it right. The book will engage and involve a reader in the plights of such protagonists as Ronnie Day and Frank Littlefield as it works to create a nightmarish atmosphere. The book is full of weird happenings and scary situations. But fully-realized characters with well-developed thoughts and feelings and not just a string of terrifying episodes are at its core.

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Regional Author Develops Talents

For an admitted "professional liar," Scott Nicholson certainly can spin a good yarn. The Boone author's latest work mixes a little of the truth-based with a lot of the unreal. The setting of "The Red Church" germinated from a real-life place of worship that was built in the mid-19th century and is now a mountain legend. The people and plot of the book, on the other hand, are completely Nicholson's creations.

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Black Music Month Prompts Later Events

June is Black Music Month. But UNC's Sonja H. Stone Black Cultural Center is choosing to recognize the accomplishments of African music throughout the year. The lack of students in town weighed heavily in the decision to begin events in late July rather than at the "official" time, said Brandi Williams, BCC information and communication specialist. The presence of Black Music Month has become known in spots for national and local television and radio stations. And it's no coincidence that Black Entertainment Television holds its annual music awards in June.

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'Bourne Identity' Mediocre Rip-Off of Previous Techno-Gadget Flicks

From opening scene to denouement, Matt Damon's new flick has a plot born of a quintessential action film formula. Take a CIA-created human weapon, toss him into the Mediterranean Sea, stir things up by adding a dash of amnesia, and you've got "The Bourne Identity." The film's unlikely and shallow plot is buoyed by some serious eye candy action, including car chases, grueling fight scenes and the requisite, though somewhat poorly developed, romance.

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Machines Don't Help Koester's New Album

Electronic flourishes are no stranger to popular music. Once Radiohead began to use them in its transformation from a good guitar rock band to a creative and artistic monster, they've found their way onto albums of every sort. These mechanical sounds don't necessarily dominate the folky pop of Koester's second album, The High Highs The Low Lows, but they make their presence known on a number of tracks. In some cases, this presence is an unfortunate intrusion.

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Students by Day, Party Starters by Night

Look out, P. Diddy. The rapper and business mogul had to start small on his way to topping the charts. Likewise, the 5fters (Five Footers), a local company that thinks up and promotes everything from parties to concerts to cookouts, is gaining steam. While its founders might not climb as large a mountain as Sean Combs did, good word of mouth and hard work have caused the 5fters' reputation to spread.

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Spacey Pop Band Luna To Appear at Cat's Cradle

The final leg of space-pop band Luna's promotional tour for its latest release, Romantica, will feature a stop at Cat's Cradle on June 22. Formed in New York City in 1992, Luna has fallen prey to the traditional mantra of, "It's hard to keep a rock band together," according to frontman Dean Wareham. The band was originally named Luna 2 and featured ex-Chills bassist Justin Harwood and former Feelies drummer Stanley Demeski alongside Wareham.

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DIRTY VEGAS

Dirty Vegas' self-titled debut systematically presents often promising, but ultimately generic electronica and neo-soul. OK, this is probably the first music review of this album ever that did not open with a reference to Dirty Vegas' single "Days Go By," which is used in that oh-so-hip Mitsubishi Eclipse commercial. That same catchy club hit that, incidentally, will be stacked up right next to Darude's "Sandstorm" on the "How-in-Christ's-name-did-that-happen" shelf on which most popular songs now sit, has brought great deals of fame to this dance trio from -- where else -- London.

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Cullowhee Gets Jazzed About Festival

Music that was once confined to smoke-filled, big-city nightclubs will soon get a chance to breathe in the mountain breeze of North Carolina. Jazz will fill the air at the CulloWHEE! Arts Festival, which will take place on the campus of Western Carolina University June 14 and 15. This is the inaugural year of the event, the idea for which came from WCU Chancellor John Bardo. The university plans to continue it on an annual basis with hopes of encompassing blues, classical, dance, theater, poetry and literature in the future.

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Merritt at Her Best on Stage

Diamond in the rough Tift Merritt has been polished clean and set in platinum. After a brief stint in the recording studio, the Southern rock artist returned home with a debut album under her belt and a cleaner, more sophisticated sound. Merritt opened her show with "Virginia No One Can Warn You," the second track from Bramble Rose, released June 4. The pint-sized powerhouse seemed refreshed, full of grit and glad to be in front of a familiar audience.

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'Ya-Ya' Fun Estrogen Fest

To enjoy and appreciate "Divine Secrets of the Ya-Ya Sisterhood," a viewer should be Southern, a member of a close group of friends and a woman. If you adhere to this criteria in any way, then "Ya-Ya" will probably be hilarious and touching, as it is intended to be. If not, then perhaps it's best to see another flick. The film is an adaptation of the acclaimed novel of the same name by Rebecca Wells. Unlike other movies derived from literature, "Ya-Ya" follows its source closely and doesn't invent any new scenes.

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Eminem Shows New Face, Same Accuracy

Forget the Osbournes. If you want a dose of insanity mixed with brutal reality, tune in to the latest spiel from Eminem. The Slim Shady LP from 1999, 2000's The Marshall Mathers LP and now 2002's The Eminem Show have provided the nittiest and grittiest on-going documentary of a public figure since. Slim Shady is the comically violent, larger-than-life side of the controversial rapper. He was brought onto the scene by the godfather of G-funk, Dr.

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Towns Promote Arts With Crawl

Art town archetypes Chapel Hill and Carrboro finally are attempting to remedy the noticeable void in the local gallery scene with the birth of the Chapel Hill-Carrboro Gallery Tour, which hopped to a promising start May 31. The monthly, Chamber of Commerce-organized event varied wildly on a sun-dipped afternoon.

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Thompson Performs at the Open Eye Cafe

It's not easy singing and songwriting your way to fame and fortune. For every Joni Mitchell and Neil Young success story, there are plenty more Jeffrey Hyde Thompsons. While the Asheville musician isn't exactly wallowing in obscurity, "the big time" is quite a ways off. Even though he can croon a tune as well as a hotshot computer programmer can create a killer app, the money to pay the bills is a lot harder to come by. Thompson didn't let these facts get in the way of a fine performance at the Open Eye Cafe on Friday.

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