The Daily Tar Heel

Serving the students and the University community since 1893

Wednesday February 1st

Arts & Culture


Docu-Drama Set in Afghanistan Finds Its Way to Chapel Hill

"One day the world will see your troubles and come to your aid." Delivered to a group of refugee girls preparing to re-enter Afghanistan, this line from Iranian director Mohsen Makhmalbaf's "Kandahar" was prophetic in the movie's premiere at the Cannes Film Festival in May of 2001. When the movie made its North American premiere Sept. 8 in Toronto, it was even more so. Now, almost a year after Cannes, this line and this film will be making their way to Chapel Hill during the film's eight-month distribution period.

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State Officials: No Cuts Directed Toward Art Programs As of Now

Members of the local arts community will be reassured to know that as state officials work to combat a projected $1.2 billion budget deficit for the next fiscal year, arts programs across the board are standing stoically against the monetary woes. Rebuking rumors that area school systems are thinking of cutting funding for the arts programs, Orange County Board of Education member Delores Simpson said the board had not discussed making cuts specific to the arts. "As of now the arts programs are still safe," she said. "As of now the cuts are not in that direction."

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Sankofa Unleashes Matured Hip-Hop Sound

Sankofa just isn't the same that it used to be -- but that's not necessarily a bad thing. Perhaps Sankofa can be best described by looking at its name. Sankofa is an Akan word that means "We must go back and reclaim our past so we can move forward, so we can understand why and how we came to be and who we are today."

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Mesmer-Rhyising

One of the University's smallest dance groups made a big impression Tuesday night when it drew more than 100 attendees to its second annual spring show in the Great Hall located in the Student Union. Mezmerhythm, a multi-genre dance group formed in 1999, packed its two-hour performance "Rhythms of the Night" with eight different styles of dance. Participants showcased their talents in jazz, ballet, tap, hip hop, African, South Asian, lyrical and modern dance styles.

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Monk Choir Tops Off Performing Arts Series

Tibetan monks will enlighten the UNC campus about their culture and traditions Thursday with a performance by the Gyuto Monks Tibetan Tantric Choir. From noon until 1 p.m., the monks will sit with Students for a Free Tibet in the Pit to perform and discuss their work. At 3 p.m., the Abbot for the Gyuto Monks will speak at the Ackland Art Museum about the several pieces of Tibetan art currently on display there.

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Music Festivals Abound With Spring's Advent

Spring is here. And, thanks to several campus groups, music is in the air. Among campus organizations offering musical performances or festivals this weekend are the Carolina National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws, the Electronic Music Symposium and the Clef Hangers. Combining musical entertainment and education, NORML will host its seventh annual Greenfest. The two-day camp out and music festival will begin at 4 p.m. Friday and last until early Sunday morning at the Chicken Shack, a camping ground near University Lake in Carrboro.

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'Bridge Author' to Speak at Chapel Hill Public Library

Students might know Doug Marlette as the cartoonist of Kudzu and a Distinguished Visiting Professor in the School of Journalism and Mass Communication. But members of the Friends of the Chapel Hill Public Library know him as something altogether different: a hilarious kick in the pants. Marlette's witty reputation made him an easy choice for the FCHPL's monthly Meet-the-Author Tea. Greensboro-born Marlette will appear at 3:30 p.m. this Friday in the Chapel Hill Public Library to discuss his recently released novel, "The Bridge."

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Chamber Music Society Defines Perfection

The Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center Hill Hall Friday, April 12 5 Stars Although The Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center sent only six of its members to Chapel Hill, the well-reputed group's performance outplayed even the biggest orchestra. The orchestra performed Friday evening at Hill Hall, and its performance was as engaging as it was technically flawless.

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Street Corner Heroes

It's Saturday night, and the sky is speared with cotton-candy pink clouds stretched like unbleached wool. Fernando Linhares kneels on a worn pad of foam rubber. Working his light brown, steady hands over a canvas, two dark planets rapidly emerge over a blue and white waterfall. The unfinished work erupts with reds, oranges and yellows. A crowd stands in awe as he transforms some spray paint and a bunch of can tops into a new world exploding with color. Finishing up, a clumsy gnat sticks to his canvas and Linhares quickly sprays him into his demise and jokes, "Now he's art!"

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Gaudy 'Sex and the City' Rip Off Overuses Tactless Sexual Comedy

"The Sweetest Thing" 2 Stars "The Sweetest Thing" is kind of like those colored, sugar-coated Easter eggs with the marshmallow filling ... disgusting yet satisfying. Or just disgusting. Directed by Roger Kumble ("Cruel Intentions"), this raunchy romantic comedy is the first feature film penned by Nancy Pimental of "South Park" fame. The gross comedic flair Cameron Diaz used sparingly in "There's Something About Mary" makes a second appearance, this time with her in the starring role of Christina.

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Radar Brings Soothing Sound Out of the Basement; Young Revives Crazy Horse

The Radar Brothers And The Surrounding Mountains Four Stars The Radar Brothers use understated, lulling sounds to put into music the feeling of floating on gentle waves. The fluid-like songs on the band's third album, And The Surrounding Mountains, flow into one another, making for a smooth 50-minute jam. With three- to five-minute songs, the album can fly by, drawing listeners in during the first track, "You and the Father," and transporting them through the entire CD.

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Jon Spencer Expands the Blues With Instrumental Skill, Rock Stylings

John Spencer Blues Explosion Plastic Fang Four Stars The wilder, sleazier version of Elvis has re-entered the building. Jon Spencer evokes the King in many ways on his eighth record. His breathy singing is filled with confidence, and he is just as charismatic a frontman. His music exudes the same sexuality and sublimity that characterized the sounds of Elvis Presley, Jerry Lee Lewis and other early rock 'n' roll icons.

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Laws Define Boundaries for Performers

If your greatest desire is to grab some bongo drums and head to Franklin Street to show off your musical talents (or lack thereof), the town of Chapel Hill has few rules to stand in your way. Joyce Smith, the Chapel Hill town clerk, said the only restrictions placed on street performers relate to where they set up. "As long as they are in the public right of way and are not blocking pedestrians, then they have every right to be there," she said. The public right of way includes sidewalks, alleys and any town-controlled property.

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Street Performin' Ain't Easy

Everyone has pipe dreams of becoming a rock star. But for those aspiring musicians who've yet to realize their dreams, we've learned firsthand that it takes more than sheer ability to stand in front of people and perform for two hours. It takes guts. Mettle. Desire for public humiliation. Fortunately, we have all of that and more. Equipped with an acoustic guitar and a borrowed set of bongos (thanks, Wallace), the two of us hit Franklin Street on April 11 with our musical revue to find out what the pros go through to put on a nightly show for the masses.

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'Lanes' Blurs Lines Between Good, Evil

"Changing Lanes" 4 Stars When a man loses his children in court, it can easily be said that he's having a bad day. Likewise, a lawyer who loses vital evidence on the way to court also can be labeled as having a bad day. But what do you get when each of the above men are responsible for the other's woes? You get "Changing Lanes," a twisted tale of revenge, full of one-upmanship, conspiracy and the lowest of low blows.

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McCorkle Place to Host Sculpture on the Green

This Saturday and Sunday, McCorkle Place will undergo a makeover of the artistic persuasion. That is when the third annual Sculpture on the Green will take over the historic area, filling it with more than 50 original sculptures by regional and local artists. "The purpose (of the event) is twofold," said Karen Slotta of the Chapel Hill Public Arts Commission. "Artists get the opportunity to get their work out there, and the public has the opportunity to see what regional artists are doing."

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ArtsCenter's Tighter Budget Streamlines Concert Series, Staff

Local artists and musicians might have a harder time finding a venue these days -- at least temporarily. The Carrboro ArtsCenter, a nonprofit organization that provides a wide variety of cultural activities for the community, is suffering from a $50,000 deficit that will curtail its evening concert series and lay off two ArtsCenter employees, according to former Entertainment Director Ron Royster. "Our number one priority is to get the ArtsCenter operating in the black again," said Colin Bissett, executive director of the ArtsCenter.

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Public Art Committee Broadens Proposal

Members of UNC's Public Art Planning Committee reconvened Monday to make additional revisions to its proposal for establishing a University public art program. The committee removed specific details from the proposal, making it more general and flexible to the University's budgetary needs. Instead of requesting $10 million from the University's construction budget, the committee is requesting $5 million from ongoing University funds and plans to generate $5 million from private gifts through the Office of Development.

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