The Daily Tar Heel

Serving the students and the University community since 1893

Tuesday December 6th

Arts & Culture


Unfamiliar Songs Fuel THV Success

Finally someone got it right. All the major a cappella groups on campus tend to pick easily recognizable songs for their concerts. But while familiarity is good, it breeds contempt: sometimes the song selection is too obvious. Often, you can just listen to G105 and come up with most of the season's a cappella must-haves in an hour. It makes such concerts tedious -- honestly, would it kill one of these groups to perform something no one has heard 30,000 times already? In theory, a balance between familiarity and creativity can be reached.

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Moeser Supports Strong Public Art Program

Chancellor James Moeser said Saturday he recognizes the importance of a strong arts program in making UNC the best public university in the nation. Moeser spoke at the second of six public art seminars sponsored by Arts Carolina. Nearly 30 people gathered to learn about public art's potential and how such works can benefit UNC. "The arts are an important part in any campus," Moeser said.

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Moeser Backs Efforts to Bring More Public Art to UNC

Chancellor James Moeser will be speaking Saturday at a seminar hosted by ArtsCarolina that will focus on garnering support for the University's public art. The seminar, the second in a six-part series on different aspects of public art's role at a university, will highlight Moeser's goals for public art development. Registration for the seminar will begin at 9 a.m., and the speakers will begin at 10 a.m. The $15 fee can be payed in cash or check, and the event will last into the early afternoon.

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Less Polish, More Soul Mark Radiohead's Flawless Live Album

Radiohead I Might Be Wrong: Live Recordings 5 Stars! Pleasure and pain go hand-in-hand in Radiohead's first live recordings, I Might Be Wrong: Live Recordings. Culled from the band's work on Kid A and Amnesiac, the songs on I Might Be Wrong: Live Recordings retain the ethereal electronic feel of their studio versions. But there is a definite departure from the polish and precision of the band's perfectionist studio work -- less robotic than human, the rough edges provide the band's impressive repertoire its full due.

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Signing the Dotted Line

A contract can be the holy grail to a band or artist trying to make it in the music industry. Being "signed" has a cachet that putting out a compact disc from your basement just doesn't. But the way to a profitable record deal is fraught with danger. Contracts come in many shapes and forms, depending on the kind of label that offers them. But they're almost always written in a jargon that defies common English, and they can inflate to more than 40 pages in length. Artists shouldn't try to wade through the legal mire on their own.

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War Stories

Whiskeytown The Raleigh-based neo-country band that gained fame and critical acclaim for blending country twang and punk-rock styles is a textbook contract casualty. In the massive Universal-Polygram merger of 1998, many labels and bands were lost in the corporate shuffle. Outpost, the label with which Whiskeytown had worked with, was killed, and the band was left with a brand new album, Pneumonia, and no label to release it. The band split in the midst of all the strife and has not regrouped, even with the Universal's Lost Highway release of its 1998 LP this year.

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Harding Bares His Soul, Jovial Wit to Crowd at Go! Studios

John Wesley Harding Tuesday, Nov. 13 Go! Studios 4 Stars John Wesley Harding playfully complained that he sweated blood for Tuesday night's Go! Rehearsal Studio crowd, and it was true -- he gave everything he had to the audience. The dynamic British folk singer/songwriter put on a memorable show that showcased the best of Harding himself, not just his best songs. His friend and collaborator David Lewis opened with a calm, quiet brand of British folk before leaving the stage open for "Wes."

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Avoid Contract Woes; Sign Nothing Until You Have a Lawyer in Tow

Q: How do you know when an agent is lying? A: His lips are moving! Of course this statement is not really 100 percent accurate, but I've encountered agents who would book NWA into a KKK Christmas party for a buck. You see, most agents and managers work off a percentage of the artist's income. Therefore, most of them inevitably try to increase their profits through "tricks" in the contract making.

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Loeb Show Lacks Fireworks of Studio Efforts

Lisa Loeb Wednesday, Nov. 14 Cat's Cradle 3 Stars It's too bad that Lisa Loeb is such a ditz. Although the setlist at the Cat's Cradle performance comfortably fit the audience's sing-along needs, Loeb's personality was a mild disappointment. She came off as very sweet, quite cute and completely unable to pull off the intelligent singer/songwriter thing.

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Merchant Stumbles Through Motherland; McCartney Thrills With Breezy-Pop Opus

Garrison Be a Criminal 3 Stars Garrison can serve up catchy pop songs, and it can deliver powerful, aggressive rock. But it's not quite as effective when mixing the two. Be a Criminal, the band's latest album, has its merits, but it ultimately eludes greatness due to the band's lack of focus. Garrison doesn't take its music in a clear direction, and the result is frustratingly erratic. This outcome is ironic seeing as how the band obviously had solid, specific intentions in making Be a Criminal.

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Pauper Players Renew Choreography for 'Line'

Few of us will ever know the intense pressures involved with being a Broadway performer. Audition to audition, they pray for a job to pay the bills and reaffirm their commitment to a profession plagued by rejection. The Pauper Players are bringing the unique stories of these singers and dancers to the stage of Playmakers Theatre with their production of "A Chorus Line," the famous, dance-intensive musical by choreographer Michael Bennett.

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Ensemble Searches For Fitting Home

The 68 instruments that comprise an Indonesian gamelan ensemble survived three months at sea, traveling by boat from the island of Java to a far-removed new home in Chapel Hill. Now the gamelan is on the move again -- there just aren't many spaces at UNC that requires a 25-person ensemble to play it and that occupies 460 square feet while in use. "You can't park your car at this University, how can you possibly park a gamelan?" asked Sarah Weiss, the ensemble's leader and a professor in the Department of Music.

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PlayMakers Hosts Holiday Play

PlayMakers Repertory Company is changing the pace from usual Christmas fare. Last year "An O. Henry Christmas" was the company's holiday contribution; George Kaufman and Moss Hart's "The Man Who Came to Dinner," this year's show for the holiday season, opened Nov. 21, and its connection to the Christmas season is tangential at best.

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Mixed Media Artist Finishes 1-Week Residency

Combining images from different sources into one seamless piece is the focus of both mixed-media artist Jane Marsching's own work and her work with UNC students. The first of the Ackland Art Museum and the UNC Department of Art's visiting artists, Marsching came to UNC for an intensive one-week program and to display her work in the Alcott Gallery in the Hanes Art Center. She collaborated with five students throughout the last week, and the end result of such collaboration will be displayed at 5:30 p.m. tonight outside the gallery, with a discussion session following.

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IMAX Theater Features Thrilling Productions

Slowly but surely downtown Raleigh is turning into something of which to be proud. With the addition of the IMAX theater at Exploris, the area has made a tremendous step toward economic and aesthetic rejuvenation. But while the facilities might exist, their ultimate success boils down to the quality of their product. Luckily the IMAX theater's films, "The Greatest Places" and "The Mysteries of Egypt," stand strong as educational and exciting productions fit for the student, teacher and casual moviegoer alike.

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'Harry Potter' Enchants Fans, Critics Alike

It's easy to hate "Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone." It'd be convenient to dislike the literary phenomenon that's now become a movie giant. The bubble needs popping. But you just can't bring yourself to do it -- Harry's first movie is great. It's enchanting and as imaginative and entertaining as any movie this year. Readers and nonreaders alike would be hard-pressed to find much wrong with the film.

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Quick Dialogue, Brilliant Cast Pull Off Mamet's 'Heist'

Heist 4 Stars In the big-money world of feature films, substance often takes a back seat to style. Flashy stunts and special effects reign, and dialogue is reduced to a series of wannabe catchphrases. But somebody forget to tell this to David Mamet, writer-director of "Heist." "Heist" is the story of Joe Moore (Gene Hackman), a savvy veteran thief who's always planning one step ahead -- think Paul Newman in "The Sting." Joe is looking to leave the larceny game for good, but a local crime lord forces him to do one last job before he goes.

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