DIVERSITY AND MULTICULTURAL AFFAIRS


9/30/2012 10:06pm

Q&A with Maria DeGuzman

Maria DeGuzman, English professor and director of Latina/o Studies at UNC, is hosting a book reading today at 10 a.m. in the Pleasants Family Assembly Room of Wilson Library. She will read portions of her most recent book, “Buenas Noches, American Culture: Latina/o Aesthetics of Night.”


4/11/2012 6:08pm

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Terri Houston resigns as diversity head at UNC

Terri Houston, who has in her 13 years at UNC established a reputation as a mentor for minority students, will resign her position as senior director of recruitment and multicultural programs, effective April 30.


3/1/2012 4:22pm

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UNC graduation rates lag significantly for black males

UNC’s four-year graduation rate is just 49.2 percent for black males, compared to a 70.8 percent graduation rate for white males, according to a 2010 study. Richard Epps, who is now deceased, became the University’s first black student body president 40 years ago today, during a time when barely 60 black students walked the campus, said Pam Campbell-Chisholm, a friend of Epps.


2/13/2012 12:13am

Defining diversity on our campus

Last week, my roommate sent me a link to a YouTube video in which a white comedian in blackface interviewed students at Brigham Young University about their knowledge of black history.


1/11/2012 7:00pm

Mipso Trio to headline Cat's Cradle after one year together

Five towering racks of analog audio equipment loom over the occupants of the small, stuffy studio control room at ElectroMagnetic Radiation Recorders in Winston-Salem, NC. The unassuming studio, a small, dumpy building with boarded windows, holds a history much more glamorous than its physical appearance, including the recording of several of the Avett Brothers’ early albums.


10/11/2011 11:06pm

A gender gap, both here and out there

The University’s male-to-female ratio may skew dating patterns and max-out Zumba classes. But come May, we’ll be graduating to a larger, even more disproportionate world: the workforce.