The Daily Tar Heel

Serving the students and the University community since 1893

Sunday June 20th

Elevate: Amplifying voices in our community

Elevate is here to do exactly what it says — to give a platform to those whose voices are often silenced. This is a page to celebrate and uplift the marginalized communities that make up Chapel Hill, who contribute to our culture and daily lives in ways that are often not reported. Elevate adds depth to stories across campus, the town and Orange County.

The page is put together and reported by members of the Sharif Durhams Leadership Program, a talent and leadership development course for DTH students from underrepresented groups.Elevate accepts pitches throughout the year for op-eds and letters from members of different groups in our community. Please send submissions to elevate@dailytarheel.com.



DTH Photo Illustration. Only two weeks after students were expected to leave their on-campus housing and attend classes remotely, students living off-campus are struggling with internet accessibility.

Broadband Task Force discusses bringing internet to rural Orange County communities

Approximately 5,000 residential units in Orange County are not adequately serve with broadband, Jim Northrup, chief information officer for the county, said.  Orange County Commissioner Earl McKee was concerned that these internet access issues were amplified due to COVID-19. So he petitioned to start the Orange County Broadband Task Force, which held its first meeting on March 3. 

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The Chapel Hill Town Council will vote on a project that would redevelop the nonoperational Marathon Service Station and the Tar Heel Mobile Home Park into a new gas station, storage building, and convenience store. The Marathon Service Station is pictured on Saturday, March 6th, 2021.

Chapel Hill Town Council to vote on MLK development that could threaten mobile home park

As of Tuesday, the Chapel Hill Town Council is set to vote on the project’s rezoning proposal on March 10. Council members differ on whether they’ll approve the project. But they agree the project doesn’t align with the Town’s land use goals.   They also share the concern for the long-term security of the residents, as the developer has voiced their intention to sell the property and potentially displace the residents if the project is not approved. 

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Empty syringes wait to be prepared with a dose of the COVID-19 vaccine on Thursday, Jan. 21, 2021 in the Friday Center in Chapel Hill.

'A shot in the dark': N.C. vaccine rollout poses questions about ethics and priorities

Since North Carolina started its vaccine rollout in December 2020, nearly 1 million residents have received their second dose of the COVID-19 vaccine, according to the North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services. But while the promise of a return to a pre-pandemic life has offered respite for some, it has outlined a competitive and confusing pecking order for others.   

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The Christopher and William Barbee Family Cemetery pictured on Jan. 24, 2020. The cemetery was active in the 18th and 19th century and where William Barbee and his relatives were buried. Nearly 100 enslaved people are buried in unmarked graves.

A new partnership honors the legacy of enslaved people buried in the Barbee Cemetery

A new partnership between the business school, University Commission on History, Race and a Way Forward and local families works to honor the 120 enslaved people who were buried in the Barbee Cemetery. The Clark family, descended from the first Black family in Carrboro, is happy to finally have their story shared. “Oftentimes, there are groups created that want to do good in the Black community,” Lorie Clark said. “But they never include people who were harmed, are marginalized, or are hurt by what has happened. This is a great opportunity to bring the relatives of the enslaved people, who were buried in the cemetery, into the process to voice what we want and the way that we want this information lifted up.”

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‘I’ve been waiting for an opportunity’: Triangle Immigrants feel left out of vaccine process

Research from the Center for American Progress shows undocumented immigrants are more likely to work essential jobs in the United States, with an estimated 5 million of them in the workforce.  Katherine Ward, a community organizer for Refugee Community Partnership, said vaccinating immigrants is especially important because they have fewer opportunities to receive federal or state aid if they were to lose their jobs or stop working due to the virus.  “It is my hope and my prayer that (the vaccine) will make a difference in the lives and homes and the neighborhoods where immigrants and refugees live,”  Edgar Vergara, a pastor in Durham who oversees La Semilla, said.  

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