The Daily Tar Heel

Serving the students and the University community since 1893

Monday June 27th

Elevate: Amplifying voices in our community

Elevate is here to do exactly what it says — to give a platform to those whose voices are often silenced. This is a page to celebrate and uplift the underrepresented communities that make up Chapel Hill, who contribute to our culture and daily lives in ways that are often not reported. Elevate adds depth to stories across campus, the town and Orange County.


The page is in part put together and reported by members of the Sharif Durhams Leadership Program, a talent and leadership development course for DTH students from underrepresented groups. Elevate accepts pitches throughout the year for op-eds and letters from members of different groups in our community. Please send submissions to elevate@dailytarheel.com.



Hogan Medlin is the current Carolina Pride Alumni Network president. He graduated from UNC in 2011 and is a former student body president. Photo courtesy of Hogan Medlin.

'All over campus, all over town': Story of Us archive preserves LGBTQ student voices

The Carolina Pride Alumni Network, Wilson Library and the Southern Oral History Program have partnered to create 'The Story of Us' – a digital archive to preserve the history of the University’s LGBTQ+ students and faculty. “I think there are direct benefits for current students both undergraduate and graduates who will, in the future, be able to access this archive, find themselves in it, find inspiration from it and hopefully see that they too fit in and they count at Carolina,” CPAN President Hogan Medlin said. “It’s incredibly important for any marginalized community, but in particular this community, given that our history has not yet been captured.”

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Alvin Howard is the CEO of Good Steward Apparel, and is pictured with his products on Wednesday, Jan. 18, 2022. 

Durham entrepreneur Alvin Howard fights cruelty, shame with Good Steward Apparel

Al Howard said the clothes his business sells are about stewardship, which he defined as "the rent we pay to take up space in this world.”  “Growing up, I always noticed how clothing was a great way of expressing who you are,” the Durham entrepreneur said. “I remember going through donated clothes at a shelter trying to find something that would make me feel a little bit better about my situation.”

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Black American civil rights leader Martin Luther King (1929 - 1968) addresses crowds during the March On Washington at the Lincoln Memorial, Washington DC, where he gave his 'I Have A Dream' speech. Photo courtesy of TNS.

Column: Critically changing how we honor Martin Luther King Jr.

"We have a lot more to work on before we can congratulate ourselves for continuing King’s legacy. We should rather ask how much actual progress has been made to sustain the achievements he helped make regarding racial equality and voting rights and pledge to continue his fight for economic equality that ended when his life was violently taken."

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A student walks into McClinton Residence Hall on Tuesday, Jan. 11, 2022. Residence Hall One, formerly the Charles B. Aycock Residence Hall, was recently renamed after Hortense McClinton, the first Black faculty member at the University, on Friday, Dec. 3, 2021.

'A step, but it’s not the goal': UNC community members react to building renamings

In December, the University announced it would rename two buildings on campus, for Henry Owl, the first American Indian student and student of color to attend UNC, and Hortense McClinton, the first Black faculty member at UNC. These renamings are part of an ongoing effort to address campus buildings with names tied to white supremacists. But some community members say it's only a step in a larger process.

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A ramp leads to the Old Well on Monday, Jan. 10, 2022.

Column: Disabled people are experts on our own health

"Now, I’m assumed to add so little to my classes that it is perfectly acceptable when I’m not really a part of them. I see campus opening back up and administrators sticking their heads in the sand, and the only decision being delegated to me is whether or not I risk my life to attend my classes. That’s a difficult decision to make."

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