The Daily Tar Heel

Serving the students and the University community since 1893

Saturday September 25th

Elevate: Amplifying voices in our community

Elevate is here to do exactly what it says — to give a platform to those whose voices are often silenced. This is a page to celebrate and uplift the underrepresented communities that make up Chapel Hill, who contribute to our culture and daily lives in ways that are often not reported. Elevate adds depth to stories across campus, the town and Orange County.


The page is in part put together and reported by members of the Sharif Durhams Leadership Program, a talent and leadership development course for DTH students from underrepresented groups. Elevate accepts pitches throughout the year for op-eds and letters from members of different groups in our community. Please send submissions to elevate@dailytarheel.com.



The Christopher and William Barbee Family Cemetery pictured on Jan. 24, 2020. The cemetery was active in the 18th and 19th century and where William Barbee and his relatives were buried. Nearly 100 enslaved people are buried in unmarked graves.

A new partnership honors the legacy of enslaved people buried in the Barbee Cemetery

A new partnership between the business school, University Commission on History, Race and a Way Forward and local families works to honor the 120 enslaved people who were buried in the Barbee Cemetery. The Clark family, descended from the first Black family in Carrboro, is happy to finally have their story shared. “Oftentimes, there are groups created that want to do good in the Black community,” Lorie Clark said. “But they never include people who were harmed, are marginalized, or are hurt by what has happened. This is a great opportunity to bring the relatives of the enslaved people, who were buried in the cemetery, into the process to voice what we want and the way that we want this information lifted up.”

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‘I’ve been waiting for an opportunity’: Triangle Immigrants feel left out of vaccine process

Research from the Center for American Progress shows undocumented immigrants are more likely to work essential jobs in the United States, with an estimated 5 million of them in the workforce.  Katherine Ward, a community organizer for Refugee Community Partnership, said vaccinating immigrants is especially important because they have fewer opportunities to receive federal or state aid if they were to lose their jobs or stop working due to the virus.  “It is my hope and my prayer that (the vaccine) will make a difference in the lives and homes and the neighborhoods where immigrants and refugees live,”  Edgar Vergara, a pastor in Durham who oversees La Semilla, said.  

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