The Daily Tar Heel

Serving the students and the University community since 1893

Monday May 17th

Higher Education


System looking to cut duplicate programs

The UNC-system Board of Governors voted Friday to cut 60 degree programs, and other programs in the system might face a similar fate if an upcoming review deems them unnecessary. The review, slated to begin after March 1, will encompass both undergraduate and graduate programs and consider student demand, operating cost and regional need.

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UNC students demand that the Board of Governors allow equal education access to all, including undocumented workers, and not let the burden of the economy fall on students and the working class.  The protest took place Friday morning, starting in the pit and going down South Road towards the Board of Governors.

Student groups protest tuition hikes after 60 programs cut

About 30 student protesters marched from the Pit to the UNC-system Board of Governors meeting Friday, determined to bring attention to how students could be affected by budget cuts and tuition hikes. Board members voted to eliminate 60 degree programs systemwide and increase tuition by an average of $208 for undergraduate in-state students in an effort to offset the expected decrease in state funding.

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UNC board to vote on program cuts, tuition

With a Republican dominated legislature ready to slash higher education funding, university-system officials are under pressure to salvage sources of financial aid. The UNC-system Board of Governors met Thursday and approved tuition hikes averaging $200 for university system campuses next year.

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ASG tables campaign to gain UNC BOG vote

As some at the University question the UNC Association of Student Governments’ credibility, the president’s attempt at improving its effectiveness was shot down by his own council members Saturday. After much debate, student body presidents from across the state decided to table ASG President Atul Bhula’s bill, supporting his campaign to gain a vote at UNC-system Board of Governors’ meetings.

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	Jim Woodward will review UNC-system programs for cut potential.

UNC system may cut duplicated degree programs

The financial plight of the UNC system will not be revealed for another few months, but administrators are preparing for a detailed review that will help them make strategic cuts when the time comes. Jim Woodward, former chancellor of UNC-Charlotte and N.C. State University, will be leading a review of the 2,000 degree programs offered systemwide to determine which ones universities can do without.

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	Republicans will be juggling issues such as tuition, the budget deficit, financial aid, privatization of alcohol sales and abortion.

For first time in over 100 years, General Assembly reconvenes with Republican majority

The N.C. General Assembly reconvenes today with a new Republican leadership ready to tackle a $3.7 budget shortfall and a number of contentious issues that could have a direct impact on students. This will be the first Republican-controlled state legislature since 1898, which could mean a constant tug of war between the state’s Democratic Gov. Bev Perdue and the GOP leadership.

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Thomas Ross presides over his first BOG meeting on 1/13/11 at the Spangler Center board room. Hannah Gage sits to Ross's right.

Budget shortfall expected to jeopardize staffing, course selection

At its first meeting of the year Thursday, the governing body of the UNC system welcomed a new year and a new president. But wished for a new economy. With a $3.7 billion expected state budget shortfall and thousands of positions and course sections systemwide on the chopping block, the UNC-system Board of Governors is bracing for the worst and gearing up to protect the academic core of its institutions.

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Board to review tuition proposals

As the University system prepares for one of its toughest years in history, its Board of Governors today will tackle two big issues facing students — the rising cost of tuition and the depleting funds for financial aid.

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