The Daily Tar Heel

Serving the students and the University community since 1893

Tuesday January 31st

Memorial Hall


DTH Photo Illustration adapted from original DTH photograph by Hugh Morton in 1981.

Interfraternity Council guest speaker sparks controversy for alleged misogynistic comments

On Feb. 16, UNC’s Interfraternity Council hosted an event addressing personal development and mental health that has since been criticized by student leaders as offensive, misogynistic and otherwise problematic. Keynote speaker David Hagan described his speech as "intentionally blunt, graphic and filled with profanity," designed that way to resonate with young men. But Memorial Hall staff complained the speech made them uncomfortable, and some student leaders are still pressing for more public accountability from the IFC, asking the council to apologize for the event and commit to violence prevention training.

Read More »

A plaque to honor William Alexander Graham, Confederate States Senator among many other titles, is pictured on display in Memorial Hall on Thursday, Jan. 16, 2020. After the UNC System's decision to give funding and perpetual rights to Silent Sam to the North Carolina Sons of Confederate Veterans, Carolina Performing Arts released a statement on how surprised they were about the decision. Though CPA's statement recognized the plaques as a reminder of Southern history, their future is unknown.

'Distorted and false version of history': CPA responds to Silent Sam settlement

On Dec. 20, Carolina Performing Arts released a statement in response to the Sons of Confederate Veterans settlement. Chancellor Emeritus James Moeser said CPA is "appalled at the agreement entered into on our behalf by the UNC System Board of Governors."  However, CPA is also dealing with its own place in history. Its primary venue, Memorial Hall, prominently displays plaques in remembrance of founders of the University and memorializing Confederate alumni. Now, CPA recognizes its role in addressing these difficult issues through art.

Read More »

UNC's legacy of slavery doesn't end with Silent Sam

He knew that the slave legacy wouldn’t dissolve with the statue’s removal. He knows the solution still needs direction. But on Tuesday afternoon, senior Nicho Stevens walked up to the remains of Silent Sam by himself. The statue that once greeted him when he passed through North Campus — the symbol that once made him feel like he didn’t belong at UNC — felt less imposing. He lingered for a few minutes, without blinking. A satisfied smile grew on his face.

Read More »