The Daily Tar Heel

Serving the students and the University community since 1893

Thursday January 20th

National Poltics


Incentives for Certification Encourage Teachers to Apply

North Carolina leads the nation in the number of National Board Certifications -- symbols of teaching excellence -- given this year. National Board Certifications are granted by the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards, which announced last week that the state gave out a total of 1,260 new certifications this year, bringing the total to 3,665. Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools has the second highest number of certifications in the nation with 351, trailing only Los Angeles.

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Report: Seniors' Needs Not Met

The National Commission on the High School Senior Year has struck an opening blow in the fight to end a disease afflicting high school students across the country -- senioritis. The commission's final report, titled "Raising Our Sights" was released last month and calls for ways to make senior years more productive. According to the report, many students are going to college unprepared, with more than 50 percent of students' educational needs not being met.

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Town Votes To Continue Equity Talks

After 14 months of negotiations, the Chapel Hill Town Council accepted the University's stance on fiscal equity Monday night but emphasized a need for more negotiations. Town Council members voted unanimously to acknowledge receipt of a Nov. 16 letter that Chancellor James Moeser sent in response to the town's request that the University help cover the costs of its own development. But although town officials acknowledged receipt of the letter, they said it leaves more to be desired and expressed discontent with the University's response to the town's demands.

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Police: Extra Cost for Halloween Worthwhile

Police officials reported Monday that this year's Halloween celebration, which drew about only half the crowd of last year's, cost the town an additional $35,000. But Chapel Hill Police Chief Gregg Jarvies told Chapel Hill Town Council members Monday night that safety should not be sacrificed to reduce the cost of policing Halloween and that the additional money was a necessary price to pay.

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Town Officials to Cut Budget by $1 Million

Chapel Hill officials announced last week that the town must cut nearly $1 million from its budget because revenue is not meeting expectations in the wake of a recent economic downturn. Decreases in sales tax revenue and investment returns are the main causes of the town's economic problems, and a variety of cuts in this year's budget will have to be made to make up a $975,000 shortfall, Town Manager Cal Horton said Monday.

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Local Charities Need Holiday Help

With its trademark red kettles and an army of volunteer bell ringers, the Salvation Army is one of several local charities hoping to finance an array of outreach programs despite the weakened economy. The Salvation Army relies on community support during the holiday season to provide food, clothes, shelter and gifts to those in need. For these organizations, the holidays are generally a time of increased giving by community members in the holiday spirit.

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Head Football Coach Stresses the Importance Of This Saturday's Game

TO THE EDITOR: This Saturday afternoon at 1:30 p.m. the Tar Heels play SMU at Kenan Stadium. This is the football game that was rescheduled in the aftermath of the Sept. 11 attack on our country. This is also a very important game for our football program, and we need your support in Kenan on Saturday. We must beat SMU to win our seventh game and become bowl eligible. Our players have worked for this opportunity for 12 months. We want to send our seniors out on a winning note in their final game in Kenan Stadium.

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Ensemble Searches For Fitting Home

The 68 instruments that comprise an Indonesian gamelan ensemble survived three months at sea, traveling by boat from the island of Java to a far-removed new home in Chapel Hill. Now the gamelan is on the move again -- there just aren't many spaces at UNC that requires a 25-person ensemble to play it and that occupies 460 square feet while in use. "You can't park your car at this University, how can you possibly park a gamelan?" asked Sarah Weiss, the ensemble's leader and a professor in the Department of Music.

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Grade Inflation Makes Marks at Harvard

The findings of a report released last week by Harvard University stating that grade inflation is a problem at the institution are similar to the findings of a report released by UNC professors last year stating that the problem exists at UNC. According to the report, half of all grades awarded to Harvard undergraduates are A's or A-'s. The report adds that the humanities have the biggest problem with grade inflation, with A's and A-'s making up almost two-thirds of grades awarded in small humanities classes.

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Men's Soccer Dominates Towson, Advances

It took the North Carolina men's soccer team some time Sunday to get used to a slippery, rain-soaked Fetzer Field in a second-round NCAA Tournament game against Towson. The Tigers wished the Tar Heels had never gained their footing. Junior Ryan Kneipper scored two goals and added an assist as the seventh-seeded Tar Heels defeated Towson 3-0 and advanced to the round of 16 in the NCAA Men's College Cup. The Tar Heels next face American, which upset Wake Forest 3-0.

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Tigers Can't Stave Off Kneipper's Air Attack

When forward Ryan Kneipper is on, the North Carolina men's soccer team's offense is especially potent. Granted, UNC dominated Towson to such a degree that it probably could have won the 3-0 contest Sunday even without Kneipper scoring. But his two goals certainly helped the Tar Heels' effort to advance in the NCAA Men's College Cup. And he also reminded the Tigers -- and his own teammates -- that he can score on headers when goalkeepers don't even think he'll make contact with the ball.

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Then vs. Now: Anti-War Protests

A recent swarm of anti-war protests at college campuses nationwide has many historians noting similarities between the response to U.S. attacks in Afghanistan and responses to the Vietnam War. Students -- both at UNC and nationwide -- have vocally expressed their disapproval of the United States' actions through teach-ins and other protests. The University of California-Berkeley held a conference earlier this month titled California Students Against the War, which was attended by more than 600 people.

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Tar Heels Top Eagles, Win Winthrop Classic

ROCK HILL, S.C. -- Sophomore center Candace Sutton scored a career-high 23 points and grabbed nine rebounds to lead the North Carolina women's basketball team to an 84-43 win against Winthrop on Saturday in the Winthrop Lady Eagle Classic. The win came a day after UNC defeated Howard 117-57. The Tar Heels improved to 5-1 on the season. North Carolina senior guard Nikki Teasley was named Most Valuable Player of the event, joining Sutton and junior guard Coretta Brown on the five-member All-Tournament Team.

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Elimination of Student Resident Parking Spaces 'Slap in the Face'

TO THE EDITOR: The elimination of student resident parking spaces is an unfortunate slap in the face for students at Carolina, as our worth is placed below that of faculty and staff. It has always been my understanding that a University embodies freedom -- freedom of thought, action and movement. At UNC, our freedom of movement is being infringed upon. Of 14,558 spaces, 480 belong to student residents, which is a pathetic 3 percent.

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N.C. Anti-Tobacco Funding Ranks 47th in Nation

North Carolina ranks 47th in the nation for funding tobacco prevention and cessation programs, according to a recent study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The study also stated that North Carolina has the 12th highest death rate from tobacco use in the nation. The study recommends that a minimum of 6 percent of all tobacco settlement funds be used on tobacco prevention or cessation programs. North Carolina is to receive a settlement of more than $161 million in 2001 from a lawsuit filed by several states against large tobacco corporations in 1999.

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Triangle's Latino Population Grows, Builds Community

Marcio Antonio Sanchez is watching people dancing from the bar at El Chilango in Carrboro. He comes to the restaurant every Friday night for cultural events like Latin dancing and bluegrass music night. Sanchez came to Durham 15 years ago when a friend said he would be able to find a good job in the Triangle. He is just one of many in a wave of Latino newcomers to North Carolina U.S. Census information indicates that the Latino population in Orange County grew from 1,279 to 4,342 between 1990 and 2000 -- a 239 percent increase.

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