The Daily Tar Heel

Serving the students and the University community since 1893

Wednesday October 20th

National Poltics


Midway Executives To Seek Federal Aid

Midway Airlines officials have announced they will seek federal aid in an attempt to resume operations and return to the skies. The Airline Stabilization Act passed by Congress last week will provide $15 billion to the airline industry to cover lost ticket revenue and slumping ticket sales. Midway CEO Robert Ferguson said in a story by The Associated Press that he will seek $40 million in assistance from the $15 billion airline bailout package.

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Officials Tour Sites That Might Benefit From Bond

Local officials piled on a tour bus early Tuesday morning and spent more than five hours visiting 11 sites that might receive money from the upcoming county bond referendum. Members of the Orange County Board of Commissioners organized and invited local officials, including the Chapel Hill-Carrboro and Orange County school boards, to take the tour.

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Making Dorms Feel More Like A Community

Recently, I've been trying hard to care about the Development Plan. It's been all over the newspapers for months, and yet it is remarkably easy to ignore it -- to skip those articles, to tune out of that conversation. Thing is, it's important that we care. Especially because it seems the plan is neglecting an inward focus that students need.

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Study Questions Tax Incentives

A research study evaluating the implications of one of North Carolina's more controversial tax incentive plans was unveiled to N.C. lawmakers last week, creating doubts about the need for the legislation. The study was conducted by the N.C. Department of Revenue. The Lee Act, which allows N.C. businesses to qualify for tax incentives in order to create more jobs and increase company revenue, currently is being revised by the N.C. General Assembly. The Senate has already made revisions, but more changes are anticipated when it goes before the House next week.

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House to Debate Redistricting Plans

The N.C. House today will consider alternative redistricting plans from each party, as legislative leaders try to bring the longest session in state history to a close. The N.C. Legislative Redistricting Committee voted Tuesday to support the Sutton II plan, which is favored mainly by Democrats, over the Justus plan, which primarily has Republican backing. The plans are named for the legislators who drew the districts. The committee, which is almost equally split between Democrats and Republicans, approved the Sutton II plan in a 22-20 vote.

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Residents Support Lee Pavao in the November Election for Town Mayor

TO THE EDITOR: Lee Pavao has all the qualities to be an excellent mayor for Chapel Hill. He has demonstrated an even-handed and thoughtful approach to the issues Chapel Hill has faced over the past several years while serving on the Town Council. In addition, he has had a successful career in business. We are fortunate that he now has the time to give to Chapel Hill and to its future. We hope that you will join us in supporting Pavao for mayor of Chapel Hill. Virginia and Ralph YoungChapel Hill

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Candidate, Ballots Represent Hispanics

Hispanics might have a more prominent role in the Carrboro Board of Aldermen elections this year, both in the way ballots are written and the candidates who appear on them. For the first time, the Orange County Board of Elections will offer bilingual ballots to voters in Carrboro. Carolyn Thomas, director of the Orange County Board of Elections, said bilingual ballots are required if 6 percent of a town's population speak Spanish as their primary language. Hispanics make up 12 percent of Carrboro's population.

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Homecoming King, Queen to Face New Application Process

This year's candidates for Homecoming king and queen will face new steps in the application process, including appearing before an interviewing committee of campus leaders. The Carolina Athletic Association is in charge of organizing Homecoming, but this year it will have assistance from the UNC Board of Elections. CAA Homecoming Director Kris Willett said the committee will interview all applicants and choose the top three female and male candidates.

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Commission to Present Report on Smart Growth

Smart Growth Commission members say a report detailing how the state can help local governments manage growth will be released in the next few weeks. The report, originally scheduled to be released in February, calls for giving local governments more power to control growth, guidelines for using the environment and fiscal resources more efficiently and a statewide vision for managing future development. But critics said the report's recommendations infringe on basic property rights, limiting what people can do with their own property.

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Class Vice President Urges Seniors to Look At All Options for Gift

TO THE EDITOR: Yesterday, with the kickoff of the senior vote for a class gift, Senior Class President Ben Singer urged seniors to vote on the Unsung Founders gift. Today on the last day of voting, I urge those seniors who have yet to cast their vote to consider all three gift choices. The Memorial Hall marquee and the need-based scholarship are equally valuable contributions to our UNC community.

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Endowment Limits Might Drive Top Applicants Away

The inability of some UNC scholarships to keep pace with recent tuition increases could be letting top students slip away to other universities, officials say. While UNC's tuition has seen two increases in the past two years, many of the University's 800-plus endowed scholarships have not been adjusted accordingly, said Shirley Ort, director of scholarships and student aid. "In our experience last year, we saw that we were losing students because of merit scholarship offers from other schools," Ort said.

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Seniors May Plant Tree as Memorial

Many people at UNC see the Davie Poplar as a symbol of the University. But in the near future, there might be another historic tree on campus, this one dedicated to the victims of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks on New York City, Washington, D.C. and Pennsylvania. The senior class is going to use money raised through T-shirt sales and other fund-raisers to plant a tree on campus and place a plaque nearby listing the dead or missing UNC alumni, said Ben Singer, president of the senior class.

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Proposal Aims to Restrict Student Visas

Fears that terrorists might use student visas to enter the United States have led to the introduction of legislation aimed at restricting visa availability. Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., recently announced plans to present legislation restricting student visas. In a Sept. 27 press release, Feinstein outlined her proposal calling for a "six-month moratorium on foreign student visas, funding for the (Immigration and Naturalization Service's) foreign student electronic tracking system and new admission procedures."

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UNC Professor Speaks On Ethics of Attacks

Students, faculty and local residents came together Tuesday evening to listen to a UNC philosophy professor speak about "Ethics and the War on Terrorism." Douglas Maclean, a former professor at the U.S. Naval Academy, began by discussing the idea that the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks are unlike any this country has ever experienced. "We must think and act anew if we are to save our country," Maclean said.

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7th Candidate Joins Race for U.S. Senate

Charlotte Democrat Ray Warren, a man with an unusual political history, has become the seventh candidate to vie for a U.S. Senate seat in 2002. After resigning his post as a N.C. Superior Court judge last week, Warren filed papers Friday officially announcing his candidacy. Warren, 44, joins a list of Democratic candidates for the seat that includes Secretary of State Elaine Marshall, state Rep. Dan Blue and former White House Chief of Staff Erskine Bowles.

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Muslims, Arabs Face Harassment at N.C. State

Arab students at N.C. State University have faced both support from administrators and racially motivated harassment since the Sept. 11 attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon. Hesham Abdel-Baky, president of N.C. State's Muslim Student Association, said he has witnessed more support for Arab students than abuse, particularly from campus administrators. But Abdel-Baky added that there have been several racially and religiously motivated harassment incidents on campus.

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Town to Host Sparklefest

Musician and promoter Mike Nicholson has seen enough music festivals done wrong for him to want to finally do one right. And Nicholson said he hopes his goal of orchestrating a successful and unforgettable festival will become a reality when Sparklefest opens at Local 506 on Thursday. Based on festivals like Los Angeles' International Pop Overthrow and the locally founded Sleezefest, Sparklefest is the sequel to last year's Shindig at Kings in Raleigh.

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Martin Speech Centers On `Power of One' Idea

The man who worked to free boxer Rubin "Hurricane" Carter came to campus Tuesday to share his experience with "The Power of One" -- the theme of Race Relations Week. Lesra Martin, the keynote speaker of the week's events, spoke Tuesday both at an intimate noon discussion and in an energized speech that night about growing up on the streets and about conquering obstacles. Martin, illiterate and a street kid at the age of 15, was taken in at that time by a group of Canadian entrepreneurs and taught to read and write.

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Development Plan Evolves

A year ago, University officials had a rough idea of what they wanted the UNC campus to look like 10 years from now. But after negotiations, debate and several heated public hearings, their plans have been modified and spelled out in much greater detail. Town officials' considerations were incorporated into the plan. Residents added input. And now construction tools aren't far out of the University's grasp.

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