The Daily Tar Heel

Serving the students and the University community since 1893

Monday August 15th

National Poltics


The Evolution of the Quest to Become SBP

During the past four weeks, student body president candidates have made their presence known. Campaign workers have flooded the Pit, and candidates' fliers have been taped and stapled all over campus. For years, candidates have used standard methods of campaigning -- posters, Pit sits and residence hall visits. But recently e-mails, Web sites and multimedia have been incorporated. Changes in technology have made the election process quicker and more efficient -- but also more regulated.

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Tech Dethrones Tar Heels in Championships Upset

When the 1,600-meter relay finished, the entire team exploded, pumping their fists, jumping off the ground and hugging each other. Then the chant began, "Whose house?" But the familiar reply of "Heels' house!" didn't answer. Instead, a thundering "GT's house!" followed. And minutes later the official results sounded over the loud speaker. "For the first time in 10 years, we have a new ACC championship team," the voice said.

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UNC's V-Day State of the Union Address

This column is to be published on Friday, Feb. 15, the day after Valentine's Day. If you are like me, you are sitting in your room alone, chewing on the petals from the flowers you sent yourself the day before, imagining you are a cow, needing only simple vegetation and an open place to poop to feel good about yourself. Of course the painful reality is that we aren't cows. We're humans. And humans grow weary of singing love songs in a dark shower and making kissy-faces at themselves in the mirror.

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Barometer

Show Me the $ Gov. Mike Easley announced that the state would withhold funds from municipalities to deal with the budget crisis. The Chapel Hill Town Council then announced that it would start accepting tips. Boom Boom A Yemeni al-Qaida suspect blew himself up with a grenade as he tried to escape from police. Tip: After you pull the pin, throw the grenade away. Speak No Evil Enron chief Ken Lay took the Fifth at this week's congressional hearings and refused to answer questions. Instead, he mimed his testimony. Almost Over

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Students --Follow Lead Of Mayors

UNC-system leaders have been busy in recent weeks. After being told once again to trim the system's budget, leaders are searching for ways to lobby state officials to reverse the order and return more than $100 million to public universities. Perhaps they should start paying attention to local government officials. Gov. Mike Easley announced Wednesday during a closed meeting with 27 mayors across the state that he will work to return $209 million in payments due to city and county governments this year if state revenue picks up over the next few months.

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'Hooking Up' Stories Leave Out Gays, Ignore Internet Dating

TO THE EDITOR: The Daily Tar Heel has failed in its mission to fully cover the entire student body. I am referring to the two articles about casual sex and hooking up from the Feb. 14 paper ("Students Sound Off on Hooking Up," "Officials Outline Consequences of Casual Sex"). Both articles completely ignored the implications of hookups and casual sex for the gay community.

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Nearly Every State Faces Revenue Deficits, Will Have to Cut Spending

Forty-five states and the District of Columbia are experiencing recession-driven revenue shortfalls in the 2001-02 fiscal year after almost a decade of uninterrupted economic growth. Thirty states, including North Carolina, have recently announced cuts to reduce their budget deficits. Another nine are considering budget cuts before the end of the fiscal year. N.C. Gov. Mike Easley recently announced that the state is facing a $900 million shortfall and has ordered a series of cuts to deal with the problem.

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Texas A&M to Cancel Bonfire Again

Texas A&M University administrators recently announced that cost and safety concerns are forcing the university to again reconsider a 90-year-old tradition. Texas A&M students traditionally built a bonfire every November to mark the yearly football game against the University of Texas at Austin. But in 1999, the 55-foot high bonfire collapsed just a few days before it was supposed to be lit. The collapse killed a dozen people and wounded 27 others.

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N.C. Legislature Likely to Consider Budget Cuts to Ease Deficit

N.C. legislators faced with a budget deficit estimated at more than $1 billion are debating how the state will raise the money it needs to balance the budget when lawmakers head back into session this summer. Rep. David Redwine, D-Brunswick, co-chairman of the N.C. House Appropriations Committee, said the N.C. General Assembly might need to cut the budgets for some programs and eliminate others to raise money. But Redwine could not specify how the fiscal hole will be filled.

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UNC Too Much for Clemson

Unless he has some unresolved self-esteem issues that nobody's aware of, it's not every day that Clemson women's basketball coach Jim Davis refers to himself as the dregs of his profession. Apparently, North Carolina has discovered the key to evoking Davis' personal demons. The No. 20 Tar Heels out-rebounded and out-hustled his Tigers for the second time this season in an 86-76 win Thursday night at Carmichael Auditorium, prompting Davis to proclaim himself "about as frustrated as I've ever been in coaching in 35 years."

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Students Feel Effects Of Sept. 11

A recent poll indicates that Sept. 11 prompted college students across the nation to change their perspectives and priorities. According to the survey, 22 percent of college students stated that they are spending more time studying, 32 percent are praying more, and 24 percent have increased volunteer time in their communities. In January, more than 600 college students from across the nation were polled on the impact that the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks have had on their daily lives. The survey results were released Feb. 7.

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Campus Calendar

Today 8 p.m. -- The Vagina Monologues will be put on in Memorial Hall. Tickets are $7 for students and $10 for non-students. Buy tickets at the Union box office or by calling 962-1449. Proceeds benefit the Family Violence Prevention Center of Orange County. Saturday 8 p.m. -- The second showing of The Vagina Monologues in Memorial Hall, followed by a silent auction and gala.

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TPAC Chairman: Directives Didn't Come From Moeser

Transportation and Parking Advisory Committee Chairman Bob Knight admitted Thursday that the budget guidelines he presented at Wednesday's meeting were not, as he originally stated, directives from the chancellor's office. Knight said Thursday that he had hoped TPAC members would be able to reach an agreement on a budget recommendation if he told them the five elements of an acceptable Department of Public Safety budget proposal that Knight outlined at Wednesday's meeting came from Chancellor James Moeser.

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Students Search for Love on Blind Date

Despite the many singles longing for love and craving companionship for Valentine's Day, two UNC students found out recently that a blind date doesn't always make for love at first sight. The Daily Tar Heel matched up two eligible students: Julia McKibbin, a junior business major from Maryland, and Steve Moore, a senior business major from Connecticut. The DTH arranged the date and the details of the couple's evening; both dinner at the East End Oyster and Martini Bar and tickets to a CHiPs show were donated.

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Child-Care Funds May Be Matched

Convincing administrators to match funds generated by the recently approved child-care referendum is the next step in subsidizing child-care costs for all students. A referendum that adds 75 cents per semester to student fees passed with 70.5 percent of the votes in Tuesday's student elections. But even before the referendum passed, the chancellor's Child Care Advisory Committee made a formal recommendation at its last meeting encouraging the University to match any revenue that might be generated from student fees, committee member Marc David said.

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Race for Helms' Senate Seat Already Heating Up

Some political pundits are saying that the 2002 race for the U.S. Senate seat left open by the retirement of Sen. Jesse Helms, R-N.C., likely will be one of the most intense races in the nation. At least a dozen candidates from both parties have already filed to run for the seat, including Republican Elizabeth Dole and Democrats Dan Blue, Erskine Bowles and Elaine Marshall, and the race for the seat already has turned heated.

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Developments in the War on Terrorism

Rice: U.S. Assuming Bin Laden Is Alive - National Security Adviser Condoleezza Rice said Thursday that the United States continues to aggressively pursue bin Laden because "we assume he's alive," even as his al-Qaida network operates without its former command structure. Al-Qaida Suspect Linked to Terrorism

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STV Election Coverage Rude, Tasteless and Unprofessional

TO THE EDITOR: After watching their "Live Election" coverage Tuesday night, I am livid that a cent of my student fees goes to Student Television. Instead of seeing students attempting to simulate the professional tone and atmosphere of a real-world newsroom, I saw a bunch of tactless, rude, juvenile and self-admitted drunks embarrass themselves, the election and UNC in general.

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Students Start to Set Tuition Strategy

Members of student government met Wednesday to discuss how to approach the UNC-system Board of Governors to protest a tuition increase proposal. On March 6, the BOG will hear a $400, one-year increase plan passed by the UNC-Chapel Hill Board of Trustees. "I think we talked about how to approach learning lessons from what happened with the BOT and how to refocus our strategy for the BOG," said senior Michael Hoffman, who was at the closed planning session Wednesday night. "We were thinking about ways to increase our efforts to stress affordability and access."

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