The Daily Tar Heel

Serving the students and the University community since 1893

Monday June 27th


All bone, no meat

Members of Student Congress have dedicated themselves to revising parts of the Student Code and to removing some of its most unclear, ambiguous language. But good execution is even more important than good intention. And in terms of its legislation regarding negative campaigning, Congress has misfired.

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Screening for and detecting breast cancer early is vital

TO THE EDITOR: Think of October, and you might imagine red and yellow leaves and orange pumpkins. But what about pink ribbons? October is recognized as National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, or pink ribbon month. As college students, our own health often takes a backseat to midterms, club meetings and social functions. But it is important to realize that we are all potential targets when it comes to breast cancer - young women and men.

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The greater good

The success of Carolina North will undoubtedly play a major role in the future of UNC-Chapel Hill and the state of North Carolina - town residents shouldn't stifle the University's flexibility in ensuring the development's effectiveness. Although the town certainly has a vested interest in the form and impact of the development, it should be careful about zoning restrictions that could potentially undermine the University's ability to serve the state.

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Lottery would be a needed source of revenue for state

TO THE EDITOR: How would you feel if you knew that your entire college tuition was paid for? Can you imagine how much money you'd save and the relief you'd feel knowing that the burden of college loans had been lifted? In light of the recent debate on the lottery issue in the election for governor, I am compelled to voice my opinion on the issue of a lottery in North Carolina. The lottery provides a simple approach to raising funds that not only could benefit education across the state but also could channel additional money into our economy as well.

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Violence used to prevent terrorism is still violence

TO THE EDITOR: The Daily Tar Heel published an editorial Wednesday condemning the Palestinian Solidarity Movement for its failure to condemn violence specifically with relation to terrorism. But let's look at the actions of two of the world's foremost opponents of terrorism, the United States and Israel. Some would argue that the deaths of innocent Iraqis and Palestinians as a result of operations against terrorism is a form of terrorism in its own right.

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Desperation moves

Too much of a good thing can be wonderful. But it's been nigh impossible to explain that to the Sunrise Coalition, an organization in opposition to what would be the largest affordable housing development in Chapel Hill history. The 50-home scheme in question is slated to be built by Habitat for Humanity just off of Sunrise Road. At first glance, the project seems to be an inoffensive and extremely beneficial endeavor. One of Chapel Hill's major goals has been to increase the amount of affordable housing in the vicinity.

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Choice means acting based on your own ideals and judgment

I remember when I found out that my sister was pregnant. My little sister. My dad called me at school on a Saturday afternoon and told me that he had some interesting news. I was intrigued, but I assumed that it was nothing more than some piece of hometown gossip. He said, "Well, you're going to be an aunt." And in quintessential Emily fashion, I said, "Oh my God! You guys got a puppy?!" Needless to say, it came as quite a shock.

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Schools must give youngsters added time to run and play

My Uncle Bubba shot off two of his toes while he was out hunting. The resulting three-toed appendage on a 6-foot, 7-inch man was, to a loving eye, reminiscent of Big Bird with occasional athlete's foot. Speaking of shooting oneself in the foot, the Chapel Hill-Carrboro City School District is on its way toward doing just that with regard to physical education.

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Oversight needed

Correction: The Wednesday editorial, "Oversight needed," stated that a inflationary fee increase referendum will go before the student body next week. Such a referendum hasn't been scheduled. The Daily Tar Heel regrets the error. Students and their money should not be easily parted. But a new referendum to be voted on by the student body might do just that. Every student who attends classes at UNC must pay a slew of bills, among them the student activity fee.

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A long road ahead

To say Lindsay Strunk has several major projects ahead of her as the Carolina Athletic Association's new president would be a serious understatement. Former President Will Keith's recent resignation has come at an intense time for CAA members, but they shouldn't let the incidents overwhelm them in their work for students. It's not like this bunch isn't used to dealing with pressure. Breakdowns in communication marked Keith's short tenure as CAA president.

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Good but not great

After months of discussion and negotiations, Congress has passed the tobacco buyout package and sent it to President Bush for approval. Though the buyout is a great boon for tobacco farmers in North Carolina and across the South, some important elements were left out in the conference bill that emerged. The new Congress should address these omissions when it convenes in January.

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Asking for trouble

You've got to wonder if Florida head football coach Ron Zook has ever seen National Lampoon's "Animal House." If he has, Zook's threat to "take this house down" in front of fraternity members and a university administrator isn't just inappropriate - it's asinine.

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American culture teaches a lesson of polarization, excess

I own a 64-ounce cup. 64 ounces. 1.893 liters. One half gallon. And it scares me. I saw it standing on the gas station counter next to the soft drink machine while I was paying for gas. It struck me as a little unnecessary and utterly American. "What's the point of a cup?" I thought. "To hold a portion of liquid that you intend to drink in one sitting. Otherwise, you would buy a bottle. Who is drinking 64 ounces of soda in one sitting? Is this really necessary?"

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Facilitating waste

As you read this, the town of Chapel Hill slowly plods along with its debate over whether to change the name of Airport Road to honor Martin Luther King Jr. The 17-person committee has two full-day meetings coming up in two short weeks, but the recently released meeting schedule already has left some committee members reconsidering their participation.

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Free expression should be respected for everyone in the University community

TO THE EDITOR: Our founding fathers had a vision when founding this nation. It included rights to life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness. At the University, we often say the First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution gives us the right to free expression, but we refuse to guarantee this right equally to all our community's members. During my first semester here, fall 2002, my family visited from Charlotte.

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Vote early and vote Democratic for this year's local and national election races

TO THE EDITOR: Any voter registered in Orange County can cast an early vote from 9 p.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Saturday at the Morehead Building during the next two weeks. I encourage all students to take advantage of this option - it's much easier than getting to the correct polling place on Nov. 2. There are a few intricacies of the ballot that people should be aware of before voting. First, voting a straight ticket does not cast a ballot for that party's presidential candidate. Voters must select a candidate for president separately.

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Protecting privacy

The release of a UNC athlete's name in conjunction with information about his drug test results is an invasion of the student's privacy and should be an embarrassment to officials. Athletics officials should work with the Office of University Counsel to devise a system to ensure that lapses of this sort do not happen again in the future.

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Improper business

Patrick Ballantine, R-New Hanover, spent 10 years in the N.C. Senate, and for two of them, he was on the payroll of Image Products Inc. of Wilmington and charged with finding new customers. For that two years of work, he was paid about $11,000. During that time, Ballantine peddled his wares to a number of trade associations and lobby groups with business before the Senate. Representatives from these groups said that Ballantine was responsible for securing at least three contracts for his employer.

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Equitable funding

It's an unfortunate but widely known fact in the scientific community that researchers also have to be businessmen in order to secure funds. But getting a grant from the National Science Foundation became a little easier last week, allowing researchers to focus more of their efforts on science. The foundation's governing board voted last Thursday to end the requirement for projects on which the NSF requests applications. Unsolicited proposals will still have to pay for 1 percent of the research-grant money that they are allotted.

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A necessary pause

There's a serious problem with North Carolina's legal system when we find that the star witness in a death-penalty case "had to make up a story," to satisfy the police. As outrageous as it might sound, prosecutors had these words on tape in the case of Alan Gell, who was found guilty and sentenced to death in 1998 for a murder he didn't commit.

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