SPECIAL PROJECTS AND INVESTIGATIONS


1/21/2019 10:20pm

Jerry Wilson wipes sweat from his face while wearing a noose around his neck at an Aug. 20 protest against Silent Sam, a Confederate monument on UNC-Chapel Hill's campus. His friend, Cortland Gilliam, joined him in this gesture. They both vowed to wear these nooses whenever they were on campus until the statue was taken down. This was intended to represent the oppression and white supremacy they feel the statue represents. The pair did not have to wear the nooses long, as protestors forcefully tore down the statue only a few hours later at 9:20 p.m. on August 20, 2018. 
Wilson and Gilliam put the nooses back on following Chancellor Carol Folt and the Board of Trustees' Dec. 3 proposal to establish a University History and Education center to house Silent Sam.  

Why are graduate students often at the center of campus protests?

Graduate students have been at the helm of campus protests at UNC since the 1960s, from George Vlasits, an anti-Vietnam War protester in the 1960s, to Maya Little, a current UNC graduate student of history who faced Honor Court and criminal charges for staining Silent Sam with red ink and her own blood last April. We took a closer look at why that is.


1/22/2018 9:34pm

Photo illustration. Though opioid abuse rates are highest in people aged 18 to 25, colleges often do not have permanent funding to address it.

North Carolina colleges are trying to combat opioid misuse — but they lack needed funding

When Alexander Smith peered through the plexiglass window of his jail cell into his father’s eyes, he saw the destruction he’d caused. Smith’s addiction to opioids – from prescription pills to heroin – had pained his father for years.  Smith finally felt that pain for himself.  But his moment of reckoning was gone as soon as he got into the car with his father, who bailed him out. Smith reached for his phone to find the nearest dealer. The addiction had taken over again, and he was powerless.