The Daily Tar Heel

Serving the students and the University community since 1893

Tuesday August 16th

Swimming And Diving


Iowa Links Class Performance, Aid

A new University of Iowa policy that allows professors to denote on their class roll whether a student receives federal financial aid has some students concerned. The new policy, initiated this year, allows professors to report students on federal aid who are either failing or do not attend a class to the school's financial aid office. Reported students risk losing all or part of their aid.

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Lawmakers Earn High `Green' Score

Local legislators continue to fare well in the Conservation Council of North Carolina's annual scorecard, which rates state legislators on how they voted on environmental issues. All four Orange County representatives -- Reps. Verla Insko and Joe Hackney and Sens. Howard Lee and Ellie Kinnaird -- received a perfect score of 100 percent on the scorecard, which was released last week. All four also received perfect scores in 1999.

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Students Tote Textbooks in Style

What used to be an efficient device for lugging around a day's worth of textbooks has become an element of style. With the introduction of the messenger and sling-style bags, combined with redesigned two-strap backpacks, backpacks are being customized for stylish and technological appeal. "I don't use it for function, only for fashion," said Kathy Nawabi, a junior from Durham, of her messenger bag. Nawabi's backpack is decorated with a colorful array of Chinese characters, symbol and pictures.

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Chancellor James MoeserAnd SBP Brad MatthewsUrge Bond Discussion

TO THE EDITOR: When you head out of town for Fall Break, we hope you'll take at least one homework assignment with you. Don't worry; no books are required and you won't be tested. But the result of your work will have a definite impact on the future of the UNC-Chapel Hill and the future of public higher education in North Carolina. Election Day is November 7, just over a month away, and the higher education facilities bond referendum will be perhaps the most important item on the ballot.

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Dinosaur Display Roars in Raleigh

RALEIGH - Two weeks before a wide variety of animals arrive for the N.C. State Fair in Raleigh, replicas of creatures from the past already are settled in at the N.C. Museum of Natural Sciences. But while the bevy of bovines at the fair will be content to munch on hay, the museum's featured creatures would have rather had a cow than the cud. The museum previewed "The Dinosaurs of Jurassic Park: The Lost World," a traveling exhibit that will make Raleigh its home until Jan. 15, to nearly 20 members of the press Monday. The exhibit will open to the public Friday at 5 p.m.

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Abortion Pill Fuels Old Debate

An abortion drug recently approved by the federal government that provides a nonsurgical way to terminate pregnancies continues to fuel controversy on the local level. The Food and Drug Administration approved the abortion drug mifeprestone, or RU-486, on Thursday. The pill allows a woman to have an abortion without traditional invasive procedures by terminating the fetus and then helping the body to expel it. Kaye Michaels, spokeswoman for Planned Parenthood of Orange and Durham counties, said she is overjoyed that women in the area have a new choice.

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Local Students Talk Diversity

Five Chapel Hill students are packing their bags and heading to Ohio for a forum on the nationwide ethnic gap in student achievement. The students will be taking part in a minority student conference at Shaker Heights and Cleveland Heights high schools. The conference includes three days of classes and discussions on ways high schools can help minorities succeed. Joanne McClelland, a Chapel Hill High School English teacher, will accompany the students from her high school. "Chapel Hill wanted to be a part of (the conference)," she said.

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UNC Must Stop Foes on 3rd Down

The North Carolina defense had one more third down - one final chance to make a stop and redeem itself. Georgia Tech, leading Saturday's game 35-28, was facing third-and-one from its own 47-yard line with just more than two minutes left in the contest. The Tar Heels stacked the line with a stunt formation, but when Tech quarterback George Godsey handed off to Joe Burns, all the tailback saw was daylight. Burns' 51-yard scamper set up his 2-yard score on the next play, giving the Jackets a 42-28 lead with 1:55 left in the game. Not exactly what the the Tar Heels were looking for.

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Web Site Allows Youths To Scrutinize Face-Offs

When Republican presidential candidate George W. Bush and Democratic candidate Al Gore spar in their first debate tonight, young people nationwide will be rating them moment-to-moment on the Internet. The National Youth Meter, devised by political activist organizations Youth Vote 2000 and SpeakOut.com, will allow 18- to 30-year-olds to rate each second of the candidates' performances as the debate unfolds at the University of Massachusetts-Boston.

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Realities of Partial-Birth Abortion

The one sure way to solicit the wrath and hatred of liberals is to remind them that abortion kills babies. The letters I've received in the last week have proven this to me beyond any doubt. Last week I devoted my column to partial-birth abortion (PBA) - a late-term abortion technique used by abortionists to kill viable unborn babies in the fifth through ninth months of pregnancy. In partial-birth abortion, the abortionist delivers the living, kicking baby feet-first to the neck - and then rams a pair of scissors into the back of her skull.

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School Leaders to Tour State Promoting Bond

University and community college leaders from eastern North Carolina are embarking on a two-day bus tour today to build support for the $3.1 billion higher education bond referendum. Chancellors from UNC-Pembroke, Fayetteville State University and UNC-Wilmington will join the presidents of a dozen community colleges on a "two-day blitz" to meet with media and residents in 16 southeastern N.C. counties. The tour will begin in Morehead City and wrap up in Wilmington on Wednesday. Martin Lancaster, president of the N.C.

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Funding Needs Remain, Despite Slower Growth

University officials still say they need $500 million to improve facilities, despite the provost office's recent prediction that enrollment growth will be slower than previously projected. At Thursday's Board of Trustees meeting, interim Provost Richard Edwards announced that UNC-Chapel Hill's projected enrollment growth through 2008 would be only 2,200 students. UNC-system officials have projected that UNC-CH will absorb nearly 6,000 new students in the same time period. University advocates have used projected enrollment growth as leverage in their quest for additional state funding.

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Block Party Unites Neighbors

A small neighborhood in Chapel Hill has found an effective solution to ease tensions between residents and students. Short Street, located between Church and Pritchard streets, is an area that has had problems in the past with its student residents. To alleviate these concerns, resident Lauren Rivers, who lives on Short Street, organized a block party where both groups could come together in a friendly environment. "We're trying to get an association together to voice concerns and appeal to student goodwill," she said.

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Next U.S. President Could Influence Supreme Court

The Food and Drug Administration's recent approval of the abortion drug RU-486 has ignited concerns about the influence the next president will have in determining the makeup of the U.S. Supreme Court. The U.S. Supreme Court's 1973 Roe v. Wade ruling legalized abortion. Some pro-choice supporters fear the ruling might be overturned if Republican presidential candidate George W. Bush wins the November election and appoints anti-abortion justices to replace outgoing justices.

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Donor Listings Cause Tensions

The N.C. Waste Awareness and Reduction Network is just one of many organizations included under the N.C. Community Shares umbrella. But that one organization could cause a world of trouble for N.C. Community Shares' relationship with Triangle United Way. The United Way accepted donor listings for all N.C. Community Shares' organizations except one - N.C. WARN. Now N.C. Community Shares officials are worried the controversy could jeopardize the relationship between the group and United Way, said Bryan Lewis, executive director of N.C.

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GPSF Doles Out Tight Budget, Fills Empty Seats

Even in the absence of its president, the Graduate and Professional Student Federation met Monday night in Bingham Hall to allocate funds for various undertakings of the graduate community. The group's second meeting of the semester began with GPSF Internal Vice President Tara Hogan trying to fill the remaining vacancies on the Appropriations Committee and the Finance Committee. About 30 Senate members were present at the meeting to elect statistics graduate student Kouros Owzar to the Appropriations Committee and journalism graduate student Joseph Pardington to the Finance Committee.

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Book Showcases Local Talent

When you're from North Carolina, it's easy to blush when you're aware of how the state is perceived by outsiders. You get embarrassed about things -- the dirty motorcycle enthusiasts who live across the street, the town crazies, the high schoolers who make out at the local fast food joint. Yes, you begin to think: tobacco, pork and the Sahara of the Bozarts -- that's North Carolina. And then you read a book like "This Is Where We Live" (University of North Carolina Press, $16.95), and you realize there's no need to blush at all.

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School Overcrowding Prompts Bond Proposal

The Chapel Hill-Carrboro City School system has announced plans for a bond referendum to hit ballots November 2001, but area schools continue to feel the pressures of too many students. The bond will respond to the system's overcrowding problem, aiming to raise funds for a ninth elementary school to be constructed by the 2003-04 school year. Nicholas Didow, a member of the Chapel Hill-Carrboro Board of Education, said he hopes the bond will have no problems getting on the ballot.

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Field Hockey Adds Firepower

DURHAM -- The North Carolina field hockey team is scoring more goals this season. A lot more. Notoriously a defensive-minded team, it has a new-found explosiveness on the other side of the ball. The Tar Heels have already scored 36 goals in 11 games (3.27 goals per game) this season, while they could manage only 57 in 22 games (2.59 goals per game) all of last season. UNC has already exceeded three goals on five occasions this season. The team was able to score three goals Saturday against a Wake Forest defense that had allowed only six in its previous nine games.

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3 Tar Heels Earn Weekly Awards

Three athletes from North Carolina earned ACC honors for their performances last week. Senior Kristen McCann was named ACC player of the week in field hockey for the second time this season. McCann scored game-winning goals in victories against Wake Forest and Duke. Also for the second time this season, freshman Shalane Flanagan was named ACC performer of the week in cross country. Flanagan won this weekend's UNC Challenge at Finley Golf Course for her third first-place finish in as many races. Sophomore forward Susan Bush earned the same award in women's soccer.

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