DTH Photo Illustration. North Carolina voters are looking to find out what healthcare problems exist in the state, and what the different candidates in the upcoming election are planning on doing to solve these issues.

How will the election change the future of Medicaid in North Carolina?

Health care access is one of the biggest issues in North Carolina.

  • North Carolina is among the 10 least insured states in the country, according to the U.S. Census Bureau
  • Both Republican and Democratic candidates for the N.C. General Assembly have focused on ways to improve the state's healthcare system
  • William Munn, a policy analyst with the N.C. Justice Center, said the outcome of the November election could impact the future of healthcare policy in the state

The OC Report

Welcome to the OC Report from The Daily Tar Heel. The OC Report (for Orange County and Our Communities) is aimed at full-time residents of Chapel Hill, Carrboro and Hillsborough. We invite you to be part of this news coverage, by sending in community columns, and emailing us.

You can also help us expand. We've got big plans, but we need the help of our readers to pay for their news. Here's what could be possible.

  • At $1,000 per month from the community, we'll provide editor and reporter resources for a weekly email newsletter and expanded web presence for news and community op-eds/letters to the editor. This would include monthly gatherings.
  • At $3,000 per month, the weekly newsletter PLUS two-page section added to the printed  paper and delivered to 197 boxes across the county. Donors benefits would include the page PDFs emailed to them in a special email.
  • For $5,000, we could hire of a team of two students to work full-time on local coverage throughout the summer break. That's $250/week for 10 weeks.
  • An additional $2,000/month would allow us to hire a part-time adviser to improve the student training and institutional memory.

Go to startthepresses.org today to help us build the OC Report into what Our Communities deserve.

The Daily Tar Heel tags stories to make it easier for you to find our more about topics you care about. Consider it a Wikipedia for all things UNC.


DTH Photo Illustration. As the election approaches,  concerns have been raised about racial disparities among absentee ballot deficiency rates.

Higher rate of deficiencies reported in absentee ballots cast by Black voters in NC

As the election approaches, there have been concerns about racial disparities in absentee ballot deficiency rates.  The North Carolina State Board of Elections  reports that 3.5 percent of non-Hispanic Black voters and 2.6 percent of Hispanic voters have had their ballots deemed deficient, compared to one percent of non-Hispanic white voters. “I’m sure there are consequences of historical, systemic oppression that sort of plays into that as well in terms of just access to the ballots and familiarity with election procedures,” said Jeff Loperfido, senior counsel for voting rights at the Southern Coalition for Social Justice Voters can track the status of their mail-in ballots using BallotTrax. 


UNC-CH students ready themselves to make a difference during this 2020 election.

2020 State and Local Voter Guide

This year is a presidential election year, but there are many other statewide and local races on the ballot. The Daily Tar Heel broke down candidates’ platforms down the ballot, from the U.S. Senate to the Board of County Commissioners, so you don’t have to. We surveyed students to hear what issues mattered most to them. Then, we asked each candidate their stances on these issues.