UNC SYSTEM


3/18/2018 7:17pm

Students at N.C. Central University, one of UNC system's five HBCUs. Photo courtesy of Keisha Williams. 

HBCUs on the fringe: what NC's U.S. Rep. Walker and the government can do to support them

North Carolina has its fair share of HBCUs, each with unique personalities. However, these schools face financial difficulty, and the government wants to step in to help.  U.S. Rep. Mark Walker, R-N.C., is an organizer of annual meetings between legislators and historically black college and university leaders. Staff writer Michael Meeks spoke with Walker about his work with HBCUs, as well as future plans for higher education. 


2/20/2018 10:35pm

UNC junior Alexis Hall works with UNC Office of Diversity & Inclusion and runs two programs through it.

UNC-system diversity programs under BOG scrunity

A system-wide study presented to the UNC-system BOG reveals disparities between UNC-system schools' diversity and equal opportunity programs and policies. The study looked at efficiency, effectiveness and transparency and found that there was little system-wide uniformity in the way equal opportunity and diversity inclusion services are designed, implemented and tracked. 


1/30/2018 7:56pm

UNC system unveiled its new logo Wednesday. Photo courtesy of UNC system.

UNC system happenings for Jan. 30, 2018

N.C. State students take an unusual approach to their solar vehicle competition, astronaut Christina Koch keeps busy as she awaits her first mission, and an ECU professor combines economics, farming and the environment.


1/22/2018 9:34pm

Photo illustration. Though opioid abuse rates are highest in people aged 18 to 25, colleges often do not have permanent funding to address it.

Opioid misuse affects young people the most. Across NC, colleges can't keep up.

When Alexander Smith peered through the plexiglass window of his jail cell into his father’s eyes, he saw the destruction he’d caused. Smith’s addiction to opioids – from prescription pills to heroin – had pained his father for years.  Smith finally felt that pain for himself.  But his moment of reckoning was gone as soon as he got into the car with his father, who bailed him out. Smith reached for his phone to find the nearest dealer. The addiction had taken over again, and he was powerless.