The Daily Tar Heel

Serving the students and the University community since 1893

Thursday February 25th

The Daily Tar Heel Election Center

Voters between the ages of 18 and 24 historically have the lowest voter turnout, and we think that needs to change this year.The DTH City & State desk wants students to vote in 2020, plain and simple. And we want to be your information source, whether that's for how to vote or who you should vote for. 


The DTH Elections Center is your one-stop shop for all of that and more. Issues from local government all the way up to the state and national elections are just a click away, and you can also find information about when polls are open and how to update your registration all the way through November. To make sure we're serving your needs as best as possible throughout this cycle, please take 5 minutes to answer our survey. 



Choose from elections for president, governor and general assembly to compare the vote shift between the 2012 and 2016 elections compared with U.S. Census demographics. 
Data source: U.S. Census Bureau, North Carolina State Board of Elections

'Living inside a bubble': How N.C. voters broke along lines of income and education

With competitive elections for nearly every office in the state on the ballot this fall, two counties on opposite sides of the state with differing population dynamics serve as examples of a greater statewide trend.  Between the 2012 and 2016 elections, North Carolina counties' vote shift tracked with their median income and education level u2014 counties with higher income and education levels tended to shift towards the Democratic Party and counties experiencing more poverty shifted their vote towards the Republican Party.

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