The Daily Tar Heel
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The Daily Tar Heel

Caroline Dye


News

UNC-system leaders paid less

The UNC system’s top administrators are paid less than their colleagues at peer institutions, making them the targets of poaching attempts by rival institutions looking to lure away the universities’ chancellors. Twelve of the system’s 15 university chancellors are paid less than the average compensation offered by peer institutions, according to a recent study conducted by the General Administration.

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News

Hiring slow for law grads

For years, students have believed that graduating from law school guarantees employment. But data suggest recent law graduates are also feeling the pinch of the economic downturn after the collapse of the banking industry triggered a decline in the demand for legal services.

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News

N.C. wind farm possible

Although Duke Energy Carolinas canceled construction of a demonstration wind project with UNC last week, wind turbine farms might still be in the state’s future.

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News

N.C. General Assembly mulls budget priorities

Both chambers of the N.C. General Assembly are set to reconcile their respective budget proposals as legislators attempt to allocate strained resources among competing interests.The House version of the budget would cut $200 million more than the Senate version.

Dr. Brian Forrest informs his patient Franklin Torere of his results after a physical. DTH/Helen Woolard
News

Care for cash

Walk into Brian Forrest’s primary health care practice in Apex, and you’ll pay only $49 for a checkup.Prices for most medical services are clearly displayed in his office, similar to a menu at a restaurant.Forrest is one of a growing number of doctors around the country who operates on a cash-only basis.

DTH/Fitch Carrere
News

Democrats are dead even

The candidates in the June 22 runoff election for the Democratic primary for the state’s U.S. Senate seat are dead even, according to a Public Policy Polling survey released Wednesday.

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News

Senate race in dead heat

With the Democratic primary less than a week away, the race for the state’s U.S. Senate seat has become a two-person contest, pollsters say.And many voters still don’t know what makes one candidate different from the other.

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News

Early voting numbers still low in N.C. primaries

Voters have until Saturday to vote early in the primaries. Although turnout is lower than it was during the 2008 primaries, it has been typical of a primary season in which there is no presidential race, said Tracy Reams, Orange County Board of Elections director.

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