Charlie McGee

Articles

Chancellor Carol Folt looks on as undergraduate students Angum Check and Tamia Sanders take the stage to show their disapproval of the proposal given by Folt about the re-erection of Silent Sam on UNC's campus. 

Thousands of grads, student athletes and national faculty protest Silent Sam proposal

“We are academics. We are scholars. We know our history. There’s a role for civil disobedience and for disobeying the law when it is unjust.”  Professors, TAs and students both graduate and undergraduate have become groups of signatories on various letters protesting Silent Sam. With the letters being shared publicly, opposition to the statue's on-campus relocation has gleaned national support. 


Students, faculty, and community members gathered on Franklin Street to protest the University's proposal to spend $5.3 million, in addition to $800,000 annually, on a new on-campus building housing Silent Sam. 

Franklin Street filled with demonstrators opposing University's Silent Sam proposal

Traffic was stopped in all directions as demonstrators marched through both lanes of Franklin Street on Monday night. Demonstrators leading the way held a large sign that read, "Put it up. We'll tear it down. Anti-racists run this town." The protest was in response to the proposal by Chancellor Carol Folt and the UNC Board of Trustees to create a $5.3 million "History and Education Center," a freestanding single-use building, to house the Confederate Silent Sam monument on the UNC Odum Village site. 


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Threats targeting UNC students take new meaning with connection to actual violence

The online account most involved in posting about UNC students is also the account most frequently interacted with by Robert Bowers, the alleged murderer of 11 people in a Pittsburgh synagogue last month. This discovery has made the constant influx of digital death threats and online harassment seem that much more real to the local activists on the receiving end.  “White supremacists are being radicalized online in the same way that ISIS radicalizes recruits,” said Heidi Beirich, director of the SPLC’s Intelligence Project.



Media

Two activists with Hillsborough Progressives Taking Action, including UNC professor Altha Cravey, protest a United Daughters of the Confederacy meeting.

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Two activists with Hillsborough Progressives Taking Action, including UNC professor Altha Cravey, protest a United Daughters of the Confederacy meeting.


A sign made by a Hillsborough Progressives Taking Action activist in protest of the United Daughters of the Confederacy.

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A sign made by a Hillsborough Progressives Taking Action activist in protest of the United Daughters of the Confederacy.


Wood pellet production factories such as Enviva facilities are often built in disadvantaged communities of color in the Southeastern U.S.

Wood pellet production factories such as Enviva facilities are often built in disadvantaged communities of color in the Southeastern U.S.