Michael Taffe

Articles

hurricane florence flooding

A year later, North Carolina is still recovering from Hurricane Florence

“Many families will feel the effects of this disaster long after the storm has passed, and we will continue to support them in any way possible in the weeks and months ahead." A year after Hurricane Florence touched down in the Carolinas, leaving record-breaking flooding and massive displacements in its wake, some damages have still not been resolved. The Chapel Hill area experienced significant and unexpected rain, causing short-term flooding and long-term ramifications, such as property loss and water damage. While repair efforts are still ongoing, the state recognizes that they must also sink resources into preparing residents in at-risk areas for future weather emergencies.


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The General Assembly, Cooper haven't budged on N.C.'s budget

With the last fiscal year having come to a close in June, changes were expected to be made to the state budget, especially where Medicaid, teacher pay and corporate tax cuts were concerned.  But, Gov. Roy Cooper vetoed the Republican budget proposal just three days before. A consensus needs to be made, but discussion is slowed with differing ideas about what to do with an $800 million revenue surplus. Republican senators have expressed their displeasure over Cooper’s “Medicare expansion ultimatum,” and are blaming Cooper for the breakdown in negotiations.  Because this is on the state level, a government shutdown isn't imminent, but that doesn't mean the pressure is off. Without a budget, there cannot be any proper funding for crucial state departments that feed into and serve North Carolina communities and provide vital wage raises, public school funding and more. 


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Here's what upward mobility looks like in the Chapel Hill-Carrboro area

The Center for Economic Studies released a report last month studying the economic development that people go through from their childhood to their 30s. When it comes to Chapel Hill and Carrboro, the results were a little divided. Black children born to parents in the bottom quintile of household income have a 2.5 percent chance of raising to the top quintile of household income, compared with 10.6 percent for whites, according to the report.


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