The Daily Tar Heel

Serving the students and the University community since 1893

Wednesday October 27th

Rachel Brody


News

Why I would rather just cover my eyes

Haley Joel Osment infamously said, "I see dead people." I don't. I don't like scary movies. I don't get pleasure from watching zombies attacking, ghosts haunting or chain saws massacring. I don't understand why groups of teenagers end up locked in a cabin/house/hotel with some sort of psycho killer. How likely is that, really? And why do these outrageous scenarios seem to keep happening? Part one, two, three, or maybe even a paranormal prequel. As prolific as the genre may be, I've managed to avoid it almost entirely. It's not that I didn't give them a chance.

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News

'Charlie Bartlett' hits the shallow end

Charlie Bartlett is just your average super-rich kid who decides to sell prescription drugs to his fellow students in order to be popular. And in an age in which Ritalin is as accessible as Skittles, there are plenty of laughs to be had watching Charlie scam every local psychiatrist into prescribing him medications to help everything from OCD to depression. Charlie then holds impromptu therapy sessions at school in which he analyzes the psychological condition and sells the appropriate drug to the student.

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News

Don't be 'Fool'ed by the pretty faces

Once again it's Valentine's Day, a time for Hollywood to lure men and women alike with promises of adventure coupled with key players of the romantic-comedy genre. But don't let "Fool's Gold" trick you into believing it is anything more than a dumb movie starring shiny, pretty people. After co-starring in "How to Lose a Guy in Ten Days," Kate Hudson and Matthew McConaughey seem like the perfect pair, capable of cutesy comedy and romantic chemistry. But the nautical nonsense in this movie washes out any potential the two stars have.

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News

'Savages' saved by acting, not plot

"The Savages" has raw acting and ironic, brutal humor, but its plot loses power and ultimately proves too tame. Writer and director Tamara Jenkins tries to present a story that avoids melodramatic breakthroughs and instead functions in the subtle neuroses of her characters. Unfortunately, this refusal to dwell in the past hurts the film, making it hard to understand the motivation for much of the characters' dysfunction.

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News

Heartfelt 'Juno' turns touchy into touching

With teen pregnancies (Jamie Lynn Spears) in the public eye, a comedy about a girl barely old enough to drive having a baby could raise an eyebrow or two. But to attack the film for sending undesirable messages to teenage girls would be a vast oversimplification. "Juno" is a thoughtful and funny film that creates complex characters capable of tackling tough themes while maintaining the off-beat humor set from the start. That a storyline about teenage pregnancy avoids both dramatic clichés and distasteful humor is a testament to Diablo Cody's unique and clever writing.

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News

Exercise classes shake up stress and expectations

'Tis the season for academic stress, emotional strain, and unwanted weight gain. The holidays, once relaxing times, have matured along with us into times of binges of both book and food. I struggled to greet my relatives on Thanksgiving with my arms full of textbooks and visions of research papers dancing in my head. Luckily there was a welcomed distraction: the fully stocked refrigerator. Of course, after the annual turkey dinner it feels like only moments before Christmas cookies, Chanukah latkes or any multicultural treat you consume are clogging both homes and arteries.

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News

In search for truth, 'My Kid' finds philosophy

Most doting parents are thrilled to hang their children's "masterpieces" on the refrigerator. But most don't go so far as to sell their children's works for thousands of dollars. Before her fifth birthday, Marla Olmstead already had received international attention for her abstract paintings and had been accused of fraud. Amir Bar-Lev's intriguing documentary "My Kid Could Paint That" succeeds in creating a film that highlights the ambiguities of art, creation and human nature. Marla is an adorable preschooler who began showing signs of artistic talent at age 3.

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News

Divine intervention

The terms "praise music" and "Christian rock" bring to mind a style of music that has a set audience with set expectations - often to the chagrin of secular music fans. But many artists blur the lines of what defines religious music. Contemporary Christian music (CCM) is a catchall term for artists whose music concerns the Christian faith. CCM stretches to include derivations of rock, country, gospel and other types of music.

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News

Everybody's doing a brand new dance, now - except me

"YOUUUUUUUUU!" Suddenly the overcrowded townhouse party organizes into straight lines and begins a synchronized sway. Surprised by the sudden need for a line dance, I smugly ask my friend, "What are they doing?" "Umm, the Soulja Boy dance, duh!" she replies as she rushes to join the ranks. "Oh, Soldier Boy, of course," I say, frantically trying to recover from my apparent faux pas.

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News

Inadequate 'Woodcock' leaves audience hanging

The title might promise absurd humor with an outrageous climax, but instead, "Mr. Woodcock" goes soft with a predictable plot and lame sentiment. John Farley (Seann William Scott), who spent his childhood as an overweight loser humiliated in gym class, is now a successful author of a self-help book worthy of the coveted Oprah's Book Club. When his hometown in Nebraska wishes to honor his latest achievements, Farley flies home to receive his award and surprise his mother (Susan Sarandon).

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