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The Daily Tar Heel

City, County Tout Rising SAT Scores

In Orange County Schools SAT scores skyrocketed, pushing the average score 42 points above last year's, with scores averaging 994 for the 1999-2000 school year and 1036 in 2000-01. "We're really proud," said Dana Thompson, a member of the Orange County School Board.

Parent and former Orange County School Board member Richard Kennedy said students also should be excited about this development. "You look at what our scores were five or six years ago, and we were below the state average. It's something we should really be proud of."

Chapel Hill-Carrboro City Schools continue to maintain their position as first in the state for SAT scores, jumping from 1175 in 1999-2000 to 1185 in 2000-01.

"I've been here for 18 years, and as long as I can remember we've had the highest score and the largest participation rate," said Kim Hoke, spokeswoman for the school system.

Nick Didow, chairman of the Chapel Hill-Carrboro Board of Education, said he is thrilled by the results. "I was particularly pleased to see the participation in taking the SAT at our high schools has increased as well as the average scores.

"I congratulate all the students, teachers and families involved in this effort."

Hoke said there also was a rise in minority scores. "That's been an area where we've been placing both attention of staff and resources," Hoke said.

A total of 49 black seniors took the SAT last year, as compared to 40 in the 1999-2000 school year. Both of the system's high schools have a 25 percent minority base. According to a press release, the combined average score for black students in the district increased 26 points. The combined average score for the 2000-01 school year was 943.

The City Editor can be reached

at citydesk@unc.edu.

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