The Daily Tar Heel

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Monday October 25th

Canvas

Photography and cinema explored through Ackland

Starting tonight at seven, the Ackland Art Museum and Global Cinema Studies department will come together for a very unique event.

Put on in accordance with Ackland’s PhotoVision display, the Ackland Film Forum will be screening two films at the FedEx Global Education Center, solely based around the art of photography in cinema.

The Ackland Film Forum is a collaboration of many different departments with the Ackland, working together to highlight different aspects of the art of cinema as well as showcasing the aesthetic power of film.

Rick Warner, a professor in the Global Cinemas Department, chooses the films and said that this fall's forum is focusing on how photography is used in film, which corresponds to the PhotoVison display at Ackland.

“It’s a collaboration with the Ackland, but it’s also something that we can extend out of the classroom for some of the film faculty," he said.

PhotoVision is a look at the history of photography though the photographs themselves, and a look deep into photography as an art form. Allison Portnow, the public programs manager at Ackland, said the first film being screened, called "La Jetée," was made in the 60s.

"It’s a futuristic, post-apocalyptic world seen through pictures - it builds this story with a voice over," she said.

Portnow said the second film, "Images of the World and the Inscriptions of War," is especially interesting.

“It deals with World War II made up of a lot of aerial footage that allied forces shot from planes,” she said. 

"Turns out that you can see Auschwitz in the photos, but the allied troops didn’t know it at the time. It’s interesting to see how we had a blind spot for something so awful.”

Portnow also said she loved how they were able to find such a wide variety of interesting and entertaining films for the series in relation to the exhibit. She said she thinks everyone, from all departments, should take advantage of this event.

“It’s an added perspective on the exhibit,” she said. “I think the films themselves will be really interesting. Every film's take on history is super intriguing, and they’re not easy to access. You can’t just get them on Netflix.”

arts@dailytarheel.com

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