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Thursday May 6th

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The women's and men's cross country teams travelled to Winthrop University in Rock Hill, S.C. to compete in the NCAA Southeast Regional Championships on Friday, Nov. 9 2018. Neither team will advance to the NCAA Championships, but the performances from both point to a promising 2019 season.
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Cross Country races in the NCAA Southeast Regional Championships

The women's and men's cross country teams travelled to Winthrop University in Rock Hill, S.C. to compete in the NCAA Southeast Regional Championships on Friday, Nov. 9 2018. Neither team will advance to the NCAA Championships, but the performances from both point to a promising 2019 season.


 
Raleigh-based artist, Eris Swanstrom, knits on a knitting machine at her booth at Festifall, a Chapel Hill festival   showcasing local artists. The celebration of art is held annually in Downtown Chapel Hill, this year falling on Sunday. Swanstrom knits on her vintage, special-edition knitting machine as shoppers peruse her racks of skirts, shirts, mittens and other knitted wool garments. Modique Couture, Swanstrom’s business, features one-of-a-kind wearable pieces of art. She began knitting 30 years ago, during the process, she discovered knitting machines. Now, Swanstrom sells her work online and at festivals.
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  Raleigh-based artist, Eris Swanstrom, knits on a knitting machine at her booth at Festifall, a Chapel Hill festival   showcasing local artists. The celebration of art is held annually in Downtown Chapel Hill, this year falling on Sunday. Swanstrom knits on her vintage, special-edition knitting machine as shoppers peruse her racks of skirts, shirts, mittens and other knitted wool garments. Modique Couture, Swanstrom’s business, features one-of-a-kind wearable pieces of art. She began knitting 30 years ago, during the process, she discovered knitting machines. Now, Swanstrom sells her work online and at festivals.


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On Aug. 30, pro-Silent Sam demonstrators brought flowers and waved Confederate flags as part of a twilight service to commemorate the toppled statue. Directly beside this, those against the fallen monument held a dance party to celebrate. As twilight service goers left UNC's campus, police used a pepper fogger to disperse the crowd. 
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During Silent Sam twilight service and dance party, police use a pepper fogger.

On Aug. 30, pro-Silent Sam demonstrators brought flowers and waved Confederate flags as part of a twilight service to commemorate the toppled statue. Directly beside this, those against the fallen monument held a dance party to celebrate. As twilight service goers left UNC's campus, police used a pepper fogger to disperse the crowd. 


On Saturday, July 21, a team of volunteer veterinarians and technicians from the Peter Emily International Veterinary Dental Foundation came to visit the Carolina Tiger Rescue in Pittsboro. A resident 16-year old lion, Sebastian, was one of four big cats to be visited by the dental team this weekend. Sebastian, the biggest cat at the sanctuary, was given a root canal, dental fillings, and X-rays. Our staff photographer Sophia Chizhikova gives us a look behind the scenes. 
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Gallery: These tigers are baring their teeth, but not for their prey

On Saturday, July 21, a team of volunteer veterinarians and technicians from the Peter Emily International Veterinary Dental Foundation came to visit the Carolina Tiger Rescue in Pittsboro. A resident 16-year old lion, Sebastian, was one of four big cats to be visited by the dental team this weekend. Sebastian, the biggest cat at the sanctuary, was given a root canal, dental fillings, and X-rays. Our staff photographer Sophia Chizhikova gives us a look behind the scenes. 


We took to Franklin Street to ask people what they think God looks like. Here are a few of your artistic interpretations.
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What does God look like?

We took to Franklin Street to ask people what they think God looks like. Here are a few of your artistic interpretations.


Edible Campus UNC is a student-run initiative related to the North Carolina Botanical Gardens. Through Edible Campus, Carolina students are able to engage in hands-on, meaningful ways with sustainable agriculture and community-based growing.  
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Photos: Edible Campus

Edible Campus UNC is a student-run initiative related to the North Carolina Botanical Gardens. Through Edible Campus, Carolina students are able to engage in hands-on, meaningful ways with sustainable agriculture and community-based growing.  


Lee Treml, a senior and music education major at UNC-Chapel Hill, spends 35 hours a week working as a teacher’s assistant in the piano lab at Durham School of the Arts (DSA). As an alumnus of the high school, Lee was recognized from four years ago by one of his current students. 
“He was always the quiet kid who was really good at piano,” DSA junior Jeremiah “Legacy” Griffin said, a 7th-grader at the time. “I was like ‘Wow, one day I will be as good as him.’”

It was during his freshman year at DSA that Lee was first introduced to the organ by his own piano teacher Fred Mason.
“A lot of what I already knew for the piano overlapped with the organ,” Treml said. By his senior year of high school, Lee was an active substitute for organists in the area. 

He eventually landed a permanent position at St. Titus Episcopal Church, where he now plays every Sunday morning, arriving early to warm up the choir. 
Brenda Armstrong, the Senior Associate Dean for Student Diversity, Recruitment, and Retention at Duke University, was the organist who volunteered before Lee was hired. 
“I’ve gone to this church long enough and been through enough musicians,” Armstrong said. “They tend to be fairly arrogant. But he is just the opposite. Humble. Creative. He enjoys, I think, this kind of intimate setting.”

On Saturday evenings, Lee drives with his mom, Susan Treml, to the Immaculate Conception Catholic Church in Durham, their home parish. He plays the organ while she sings along in the choir.
“Lee never had private [piano] lessons, he just started to play in middle school” Mrs. Treml said. “When he told me Mr. Mason offered to teach him the organ I said ‘You’re kidding,’ and he said ‘Yeah it’s free! You just have to buy me organ shoes.’”

Lee would like to be a full-time minister at a Catholic parish, and is in the process of applying to graduate school to get a Masters of Sacred Music (MSM). 
“I just prayed about it a lot, and eventually I felt like God was calling me to be a music minister,” Lee said. “That’s what I was really desiring to do, and I feel like God wouldn’t give you a desire to to something unless you really wanted to do it.”
Shorter-term, Lee and his mom will be visiting Vatican City over spring break, which for Lee falls on the same schedule as DSA.  
News

Pulling Out All The Stops: Local Organ Player

Lee Treml, a senior and music education major at UNC-Chapel Hill, spends 35 hours a week working as a teacher’s assistant in the piano lab at Durham School of the Arts (DSA). As an alumnus of the high school, Lee was recognized from four years ago by one of his current students.  “He was always the quiet kid who was really good at piano,” DSA junior Jeremiah “Legacy” Griffin said, a 7th-grader at the time. “I was like ‘Wow, one day I will be as good as him.’” It was during his freshman year at DSA that Lee was first introduced to the organ by his own piano teacher Fred Mason. “A lot of what I already knew for the piano overlapped with the organ,” Treml said. By his senior year of high school, Lee was an active substitute for organists in the area.  He eventually landed a permanent position at St. Titus Episcopal Church, where he now plays every Sunday morning, arriving early to warm up the choir.  Brenda Armstrong, the Senior Associate Dean for Student Diversity, Recruitment, and Retention at Duke University, was the organist who volunteered before Lee was hired.  “I’ve gone to this church long enough and been through enough musicians,” Armstrong said. “They tend to be fairly arrogant. But he is just the opposite. Humble. Creative. He enjoys, I think, this kind of intimate setting.” On Saturday evenings, Lee drives with his mom, Susan Treml, to the Immaculate Conception Catholic Church in Durham, their home parish. He plays the organ while she sings along in the choir. “Lee never had private [piano] lessons, he just started to play in middle school” Mrs. Treml said. “When he told me Mr. Mason offered to teach him the organ I said ‘You’re kidding,’ and he said ‘Yeah it’s free! You just have to buy me organ shoes.’” Lee would like to be a full-time minister at a Catholic parish, and is in the process of applying to graduate school to get a Masters of Sacred Music (MSM).  “I just prayed about it a lot, and eventually I felt like God was calling me to be a music minister,” Lee said. “That’s what I was really desiring to do, and I feel like God wouldn’t give you a desire to to something unless you really wanted to do it.” Shorter-term, Lee and his mom will be visiting Vatican City over spring break, which for Lee falls on the same schedule as DSA.  


From students couches to prison beds, Eyes Ears Nose and Paws puppies train to become service dogs. The dogs spend time with their "puppy parents", usually community members, until they are then trained by inmates in Warren Correctional Institution and Caswell Correctional Center in North Carolina.

The mission of EENP is to offer life-changing support to clients while also giving inmates a chance to learn skills they'll need once they are discharged. The dogs help to bring joy, purpose and a sense of home to inmates around the state.
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Prisoners, puppies and a purpose: N.C. inmates train service dogs

From students couches to prison beds, Eyes Ears Nose and Paws puppies train to become service dogs. The dogs spend time with their "puppy parents", usually community members, until they are then trained by inmates in Warren Correctional Institution and Caswell Correctional Center in North Carolina. The mission of EENP is to offer life-changing support to clients while also giving inmates a chance to learn skills they'll need once they are discharged. The dogs help to bring joy, purpose and a sense of home to inmates around the state.


Students at UNC missed two and a half days of classes due to Winter Storm Inga — but outside of the classroom, Tar Heels managed to have some fun. 
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Campus, town covered in snow

Students at UNC missed two and a half days of classes due to Winter Storm Inga — but outside of the classroom, Tar Heels managed to have some fun. 


The Daily Tar Heel for April 2, 2021

Special Print Edition

Games & Horoscopes

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