NATIONAL-POLTICS


9/16/2020 9:31pm

DTH Photo Illustration. Members of UNC’s chapter of the environmental honors fraternity Epsilon Eta announced their decision to abolished the group after former members spoke out about its role in fostering white supremacy. The post read, “As a historically exclusive and majority-white institution with semblances of Greek life, we have contributed to the preservation of white supremacy on UNC-Chapel Hill’s campus. Our actions have marginalized and silenced BIPOC voices. To address these injustices, we view abolition as the most direct course of action to dismantle white supremacy.”

'Not reformable': Members of UNC Epsilon Eta abolish the honors fraternity

Members of UNC’s chapter of the environmental honors fraternity Epsilon Eta announced the abolition of the group in an Instagram post on Sept. 2 after former members called out the fraternity for its role in upholding a space rooted in white supremacy. “As a historically exclusive and majority-white institution with semblances of Greek life, we have contributed to the preservation of white supremacy on UNC-Chapel Hill’s campus," the post said. The letter and abolition of the group has sparked a conversation among UNC students and within Ep Eta’s own former membership group. “It needs to be the act of abolishing it that shows that we don't support those values,” former Ep Eta member Michael Byrd said.


9/16/2020 8:28pm

(From left) Lynne Privette, Jamie Sohn and Tiz Giordano hand out care packages to a first-year outside of the George Watts Hill Alumni Center on Wednesday, Sep. 16, 2020 through Chapel Hill/Carrboro Mothers Club. Over 35 students received personalized packages and community members made 75 homemade masks in support of the initiative. "The average care package weighed about seven pounds," Sohn said.

Moms in Chapel Hill and Carrboro supply homemade care packages to UNC students

Tiz Giordano, a member of the Chapel Hill/Carrboro Mothers Club, said they started a Facebook group called Local Parents Supporting UNC Students and invited members of the Mothers Club to join several projects to help students. They said the care package idea arose on the Facebook page and parents began the project over Labor Day weekend. Over 52 care packages were distributed to UNC students this week.


9/16/2020 8:03am

Several student volunteers work a table in the Pit to assist others in registering to vote on Oct. 1, 2019.

Editorial: Students must vote in the next election

"Even if you feel let down or disappointed by politics, voting is the most direct and effective way to have a say in what goes on in our government, especially as young people."


9/15/2020 11:26pm

(From left) Frank Baumgartner, Jennifer Ho and Sharon Holland discuss their collaborative "Intersectionality: Race, Gender, Sexuality and Social Justice" course at the Gray Squirrel coffee shop in Carrboro in 2016. Photo courtesy of Kristen Chavez, UNC College of Arts & Sciences.

Faculty of color consider leaving, cite lack of opportunities and toxic environment

UNC faculty said they have considered leaving the University for peer institutions due to a lack of leadership opportunities and a toxic environment for faculty who are people of color. “The work that we do is not valued as much as work that other faculty do,” Jennifer Ho said. Jennifer Ho was the associate director of the UNC Institute for the Arts and Humanities — until she left in June 2019. “A lot of us were going to leave at a certain point because one, we couldn't get leadership positions, and two, who would want to stay in this climate?” Sharon Holland, chairperson of the Department of American Studies and ​Townsend Ludington distinguished professor, said.


9/15/2020 11:21pm

DTH Photo Illustration. A student pulls up the Twitter app on their phone. With UNC's campus shutdown in the spring, more and more students have turned to social media for activist work.

Column: Put the personal before the political

"If we aren’t holding the people in our community accountable, our politics are largely empty — they're performative, self-serving, feel-good mechanisms which allow us to simultaneously ignore and other ourselves from the very systems we claim to be fighting against."