The Daily Tar Heel

Serving the students and the University community since 1893

Sunday June 13th

Elevate: Amplifying voices in our community

Elevate is here to do exactly what it says — to give a platform to those whose voices are often silenced. This is a page to celebrate and uplift the marginalized communities that make up Chapel Hill, who contribute to our culture and daily lives in ways that are often not reported. Elevate adds depth to stories across campus, the town and Orange County.

The page is put together and reported by members of the Sharif Durhams Leadership Program, a talent and leadership development course for DTH students from underrepresented groups.Elevate accepts pitches throughout the year for op-eds and letters from members of different groups in our community. Please send submissions to elevate@dailytarheel.com.



DTH Photo Illustration. The Registrar notified seniors that they will have the option to choose the name that appears on their diploma in ConnectCarolina.

After five-year fight, UNC allows graduates to specify name on diploma

The University Registrar notified seniors that they now have the ability to specify the name that appears on their diplomas. This decision allows students, who may not go by their legal names, to display the name they identify with on their diplomas.  Assistant Provost and University Registrar Lauren DiGrazia said the goal of the decision is to increase student pride in their accomplishments. 

Read More »

A demonstrator holds a sign at a community demonstration in Raleigh, North Carolina on April 23, 2021.

Andrew Brown Jr.'s family will be shown portion of body cam footage, judge rules

On Wednesday, a North Carolina judge denied the release of the footage of Andrew Brown Jr.'s shooting to the media. Brown was sitting behind the wheel of his car at his Elizabeth City home when local officers opened fire on him the morning of April 21. The footage will be released to Brown's son, Khalil Ferebee, the attorney representing the victim and other family within one degree of kinship in the next 10 days.

Read More »

Camille Parker, who is from Durham, is carving a space for Black women country artists and fans. Photo courtesy of UNC Media Hub. 

Meet Camille Parker, a beacon for Black women in country music

Raised in Durham, Camille Parker is Bull City bred. It was there that she was introduced to Linda Martell, the Pointer Sisters, Charlie Pride, and notably, Rissi Palmer. Now, over a decade later, Parker is a part of Palmer's "Color Me Country Class of 2021" and released her first single called "The Flame" in March 2021.  Despite challenges facing Black women trying to enter country music, Parker has burst on the scene and been embraced by Black women in the industry, such as Grammy-nominated Mickey Guyton.

Read More »