Alice Bennett

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Meet the community paramedics working to alleviate North Carolina's opioid crisis

When Emergency medical services arrive to help a person who has overdosed on opioids, it’s anyone’s guess what the scene will look like. When the traditional role of the paramedic is finished, they're immediately on to the next call — and their role is growing as North Carolina tries to combat the opioid epidemic. Orange County recently joined a pilot program in the state to make community paramedics a permanent part of the system, and it's not the only program in the county recently created to provide these services.


A crowd crosses the street at the intersection of Franklin Street and Columbia Street on Friday, Oct. 11, 2019. In a 2016 survey conducted as part of Chapel Hill's ADA transition plan, respondents prioritized bus stops, commercial areas, and schools as locations to improve accessibility.

Beyond reasonable modifications: What it's like getting around town with a disability

“I pretty much have to calculate every step, which is a very common experience for people with mobility issues like myself,” Simpson said. “There’s definitely certain locations that I can't go.” In 2017, the Town of Chapel Hill created an Americans with Disabilities Act Transition Plan in hopes of increasing the town's accessibility for people with disabilities. This plan came about after reports showed Chapel Hill's low level of compliancy with accessibility standards.  



Media

 An empty pedestal is all that remains of the Confederate monument in front of the Durham County Commissioners building. A committee tasked with the monument's future suggested that the city place the statue in a nearby building. 

Durham Confederate Monument

 An empty pedestal is all that remains of the Confederate monument in front of the Durham County Commissioners building. A committee tasked with the monument's future suggested that the city place the statue in a nearby building.