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The Daily Tar Heel

Eliza Kern


The Daily Tar Heel
News

Thorp recommends highest allowable tuition increase

Chancellor Holden Thorp recommended that the maximum allowed tuition increase come before the Board of Trustees today. In making his selection, Thorp cited the difficult economic and political climate as reasons for his decision to pass over at least two other proposals that would have lessened the burden on some students.

The Daily Tar Heel
News

Tuition to rise at least 5.6 percent

UNC’s tuition policy-making body approved three different increase recommendations Wednesday, each of which would raise undergraduate tuition by at least 5.6 percent, or about $250 for residents and $1,300 for non-residents.

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News

Some UNC administrators want to raise faculty salaries from increased tuition revenue

Administrators will consider devoting a portion of revenue generated from the 2011-12 tuition increase to raising salaries for faculty, who haven’t seen increases in several years as a result of financial cutbacks. Salaries of state employees have been frozen by the state since early 2009. Executive Vice Chancellor and Provost Bruce Carney has proposed allocating about $2.5 million of the approximately $15 million in tuition revenue toward raising salaries for faculty members on a merit basis.

News

University Day focuses on Innovation

For Chancellor Holden Thorp, the immediate future doesn’t look bright. He has to cut approximately $54 million from UNC’s budget, determine the future of Greek life at the University, rebuild a football team marred by an NCAA investigation and find funding for the delayed Carolina North development.

The Daily Tar Heel
News

Tuition decision process questioned

Several members called for a new, comprehensive tuition plan that would streamline the process and provide predictability for students in future years — likely through much higher tuition that could more closely align UNC with its peer institutions’ in-state cost of attendance.

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