Hannah McClellan

Articles

comp-sci-graphic.png

Waitlists and frustrations grow as UNC's computer science department tries to keep up

Student participation in the computer science department at UNC has skyrocketed over the last decade, but issues have emerged from the department's inability to accommodate its newfound demand. While the number of declared or intended computer science majors has increased by more than tenfold since fall 2009, the department's faculty total has risen only 8.2 percent over the same time period.  While the University recently extended a hint of incoming relief, the expectation remains that class cuts, reduced enrollment availability and other restrictive measures will make life increasingly difficult for computer science majors.


Alexandra Smith, a senior media and journalism and Hispanic linguistics double major is photographed in her apartment on Saturday, Nov. 9, 2019. “I just wish people at UNC realized [mental health is] something that shouldn’t be stigmatized,” Smith said. “It’s something that should be normal and prioritized just as much as your physical health is.”

Students work to improve their mental health as UNC works to improve its resources

Several UNC students are speaking out about their mental health, and how they feel UNC should better accommodate students with mental illnesses. In April 2019, the Mental Health Task Force at UNC released a report showing that counseling services on campus are being used at an increasing rate. This trend also exists at colleges and universities nationwide. UNC is making a variety of changes, such as introducing a 24/7 CAPS hotline, to improve mental health care at UNC. Still, some students think the University should be doing more to provide this type of care. 


A SpotterEDU device sits at the front of the room in Hanes 117 as a student writes on the blackboard underneath on Tuesday, Oct. 16, 2019.

How UNC got the tech to track men's basketball, football players' class attendance

Emails and financial agreements received by the DTH through multiple public records requests reveal details of the lead-up to and implementation at UNC of SpotterEDU. The technology, developed and operated by a Chicago-based consulting firm, tracks the class attendance of student-athletes through beacon devices with an automatic Bluetooth connection to their smartphones.  Early last month, the DTH reported the existence of the new program at UNC. While the University declined at the time to state which sports it is using the new technology for, new documents suggest that SpotterEDU has been applied only to select players from the football and men's basketball teams.


athlete tracking graphic-01.png

UNC tracking student-athlete class attendance through third-party beacon tech

As an attempt to make sure the athletics attendance policy is being upheld by student-athletes, new beacon technology has been installed in classrooms throughout the University. The purpose of the beacons are to communicate with mobile devices to ensure that the athletes are attending class and in class for the duration of the period.  Though the technology is promised by its distributing organization to be non-invasive and that the software lacks tracking capabilities outside of the classroom; some UNC professors are concerned that the technology poses a privacy threat and surveils student-athletes, with the potential to spread into further supervision of student whereabouts. 



Media

Morehead Planetarium and Science Center, one of the oldest planetariums in the United States, is located on the campus of UNC-Chapel Hill.

Morehead Planetarium

Morehead Planetarium and Science Center, one of the oldest planetariums in the United States, is located on the campus of UNC-Chapel Hill.


UNC-system President Margaret Spellings met with reporters on Wednesday to discuss her early resignation, Silent Sam and her relocation to North Carolina.

fullsizeoutput_2b37.jpeg

UNC-system President Margaret Spellings met with reporters on Wednesday to discuss her early resignation, Silent Sam and her relocation to North Carolina.


The Board of Governors' Nov. 9, 2018 meeting included remarks from Margaret Spellings on her announcement to resign as UNC-system president, a public comment session on Silent Sam and a grant supporting adult students. 

bog

The Board of Governors' Nov. 9, 2018 meeting included remarks from Margaret Spellings on her announcement to resign as UNC-system president, a public comment session on Silent Sam and a grant supporting adult students. 


Joseph Caddell, a visiting lecturer in the History department, sits in his office — which is brimming with books and posters.

Joseph Caddell

Joseph Caddell, a visiting lecturer in the History department, sits in his office — which is brimming with books and posters.