The Daily Tar Heel

Serving the students and the University community since 1893

Thursday December 2nd

Kristen Williams


News

Franken's broadcast stays left of the dial

He’s good enough, he’s smart enough, and doggone it, people like him. Al Franken, famous for his Stuart Smalley character on “Saturday Night Live,” attracted an audience of about 300 Wednesday afternoon as he broadcast his liberal political radio show live from the Student Union auditorium for three hours.

Read More »
News

Writers make an a-peel-ing blend

Eventually, any journalist might tire of conducting interviews. Not Peter Koechley, staff writer for The Onion. But it might help that in the newsroom of his satirical weekly newspaper, few outgoing calls are for quotes. The Onion, self-proclaimed “America’s Finest News Source,” relies on the imagination and dauntlessness of its staff to fill its paper with exciting and controversial news. And it’s all made up.

Read More »
News

Sorvino to star in Fiddler role

Paul Sorvino isn’t a Mafioso. But he does play one on screen. Out of the 105 films in which he has appeared, Sorvino is mostly remembered for the seven roles he has played as a Mafia member. The macho and gruff image exhibited through these characters is a stretch for the articulate actor, who begins his run this weekend as Tevye in “Fiddler on the Roof,” the latest production of the North Carolina Theatre in Raleigh.

Read More »
News

Annals of UNC memory include high-profile acts

The Mamas and the Papas dealt with poor acoustics in Carmichael Gymnasium, so what was OutKast's problem? Yes, canonized acts such as The Mamas and the Papas performed on campus, and they weren't alone. Despite the decline in the number of quality musicians and acts playing on UNC's campus in recent years, it once was a hotbed for major acts and festivals. From Memorial Hall to Carmichael Gymnasium to the "Tin Can," campus was a major venue for touring artists, giving them the opportunity to cater to student audiences on their turf.

Read More »
News

Jimmy's latest guarantees dim 'Futures'

Even if the thought of Jimmy Eat World's hit "The Middle" elicits primal screaming and a flip of the radio dial, the band's latest album offers more straight-to-radio appeal. With its 2001 release, Bleed American, the band garnered success via "The Middle" -- but the catchy ditty isn't congruent with the rest of the band's efforts. This fact is evident on the band's latest album, Futures.

Read More »
News

String-plucking 'Way' models inconsistency

It's been said that people can mellow with age, and the same can be true for bands -- especially in the case of Acoustic Syndicate. On its latest release, Long Way Round, the band stumbles, slumping from its last effort, the bubbly and bouncy Terra Firma. Acoustic Syndicate's albums have a penchant for blending introspective lyrics with more narrative fare. The band's newest product continues the trend, but its lyrics are weaker than those on Terra Firma.

Read More »
News

Empire records

In the early '90s, amid a sea of teeny boppers such as New Kids on the Block, a rock revival known as grunge emerged. To many music aficionados, it was a welcome relief and a breath of fresh air to the music scene, as well as to the Billboard charts. The cyclical phenomenon is now reoccurring, as indie bands are filling the spots at the top of Billboard charts once reserved for Britney Spears and company. Initially, a garage-rock renaissance brought acts such as The Strokes and The Vines to major record labels, which in turn brought their bands to the airwaves.

Read More »
News

'One by One' Exhibits Foo's Grunge Growth

Foo Fighters One by One 4 Stars Don't expect a Mentos-like video for any of the songs on the Foo Fighters' latest album, One by One. The tongue-in-cheek video for "Big Me" from the band's first album showcased its irreverent attitude, but One by One exhibits its growth. The band's quirkiness pervades on its latest album, but while the tracks feature more mature lyrics they remain stagnant instrumentally.

Read More »
News

"Martha" Escapes Cliches, Teases Audience

"Mostly Martha" 4 Stars "Mostly Martha" might look like Jell-O, but it tastes like creme brulee. Simple in composition yet strong in story, the movie is delicious and rich. The film blends drama and comedy into a palatable movie and recycles cliches into zesty new scenarios. The story centers on Martha, a headstrong German chef, who takes in her niece, Lina, after the girl's mother dies. As Martha's life takes a sudden turn to motherhood at home, her work suffers a blow when an eccentric Italian chef named Mario begins working with her and edging into her territory.

Read More »
News

Improv Comedy Dates Back Decades, Births Acting Icons

"Whose Line is it Anyway?" is recognized nationally as the premier improvisational comedy show, but improv groups existed long before Drew Carey rang his buzzer. One of the first improv groups began in the early 1950s when students at the University of Chicago banded together for the sake of improv. The students went through a few name changes before emerging as The Second City. After gaining popularity -- Time magazine even dubbed it "a temple of satire" -- more Second City groups have popped up in Toronto, Detroit, Las Vegas, Cleveland and Los Angeles.

Read More »

More articles »

Welcome Back Edition 2021

Special Print Edition

Games & Horoscopes

Print Edition Games Archive