The Daily Tar Heel

Serving the students and the University community since 1893

Sunday June 20th

Elevate: Amplifying voices in our community

Elevate is here to do exactly what it says — to give a platform to those whose voices are often silenced. This is a page to celebrate and uplift the marginalized communities that make up Chapel Hill, who contribute to our culture and daily lives in ways that are often not reported. Elevate adds depth to stories across campus, the town and Orange County.

The page is put together and reported by members of the Sharif Durhams Leadership Program, a talent and leadership development course for DTH students from underrepresented groups.Elevate accepts pitches throughout the year for op-eds and letters from members of different groups in our community. Please send submissions to elevate@dailytarheel.com.



(From left) Frank Baumgartner, Jennifer Ho and Sharon Holland discuss their collaborative "Intersectionality: Race, Gender, Sexuality and Social Justice" course at the Gray Squirrel coffee shop in Carrboro in 2016. Photo courtesy of Kristen Chavez, UNC College of Arts & Sciences.

Faculty of color consider leaving, cite lack of opportunities and toxic environment

UNC faculty said they have considered leaving the University for peer institutions due to a lack of leadership opportunities and a toxic environment for faculty who are people of color. “The work that we do is not valued as much as work that other faculty do,” Jennifer Ho said. Jennifer Ho was the associate director of the UNC Institute for the Arts and Humanities — until she left in June 2019. “A lot of us were going to leave at a certain point because one, we couldn't get leadership positions, and two, who would want to stay in this climate?” Sharon Holland, chairperson of the Department of American Studies and ​Townsend Ludington distinguished professor, said.

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From left, Taylor Springs of the NC State chapter of the Native American Sorority Alpha Pi Omega and Brooke Spaulding of the Campbell chapter pick up carnations for the silent walk held for the anniversary of Faith Hedgepeth's death on Saturday, Sept. 7, 2013. 

Eight years after her murder, Native American sorority remembers Faith Hedgepeth

On the evening before Faith Hedgepeth died in 2012, she attended an event for Alpha Pi Omega, the nation’s oldest and largest Native American Greek-letter organization. She was inducted into the sorority as an honorary member in 2013. With this month being the eighth anniversary of Hedgepeth’s death, former neighbor and distant relative Zianne Richardson suggested the chapter do something special to honor her memory. 

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A police car parked on Franklin Street flashes its lights on Saturday, Aug. 29, 2020.

Numbers show over-policing in historically Black areas, and history tells more

Historically Black neighborhoods in Chapel Hill have experienced disproportionate policing, but the numbers only tell part of the story. Gentrification over the past decade has changed the demographics of neighborhoods and therefore who commits crimes.  Longtime residents say they've seen a double standard in how the law is enforced, but Chapel Hill Police Chief Chris Blue said the police department works hard to avoid that.   “I’ve seen the positive side of the police department and the negative side of the police department,” Northside resident Delores Bailey said.

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